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Narrative

The list "Narrative" has been viewed 15 times.
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  • Utopia Band
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    rank #1 · 13
    Utopia was a rock band from Brazil, formed in Guarulhos, São Paulo in 1989, formed by members of the future group Mamonas Assassinas.
  • Mirza Adeeb
    Mirza Adeeb Pakistani Urdu writer of drama and short story
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    Mirza Adeeb, PP, BA (Hon), (Urdu: مرزا ادیب‎—Mirzā Adīb; 4 April 1914 — 31 July 1999), also known as Meerza Adeeb, (میرزا ادیب—Mīrzā Adīb), was a Pakistani Urdu writer of dramas and short stories. His plays and short stories won him six prizes and awards from the Pakistan Writers' Guild.
  • Fantasy
    Fantasy Band
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    Fantasy is a genre of speculative fiction set in a fictional universe, often inspired by real world myth and folklore. Its roots are in oral traditions, which then became literature and drama. From the twentieth century it has expanded further into various media, including film, television, graphic novels, manga and video games.
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    Theological fiction is fictional writing which shapes people's attitudes towards theological beliefs. It is typically instructional or exploratory rather than descriptive, and it engages specifically with the theoretical ideas which underlie and shape typical responses to religion. Theological fiction, as a concept, is used by both theists and atheists, such as in fictional pantheons and cultures in theological fantasy literature.
  • Tragic hero Stock character; hero with a major flaw that leads to their eventual death and downfall
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    A tragic hero is the protagonist of a tragedy in dramas. In his Poetics, Aristotle records the descriptions of the tragic hero to the playwright and strictly defines the place that the tragic hero must play and the kind of man he must be. Aristotle based his observations on previous dramas. Many of the most famous instances of tragic heroes appear in Greek literature, most notably the works of Sophocles and Euripides.
  • Fictional city
    Fictional city Town or city that does not exist in real life
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    A fictional city refers to a town, city or village that is invented for fictional stories and does not exist in real life, or which people believe to exist without definitive proof, such as Plato's account of Atlantis.
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    Hypertext fiction is a genre of electronic literature, characterized by the use of hypertext links that provide a new context for non-linearity in literature and reader interaction. The reader typically chooses links to move from one node of text to the next, and in this fashion arranges a story from a deeper pool of potential stories. Its spirit can also be seen in interactive fiction.
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    Dialogue, in fiction, is a verbal exchange between two or more characters (but can also involve strategic use of silence). If there is only one character talking aloud, it is a monologue.
  • Exposition (narrative) Background information within a narrative; one of four rhetorical modes
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    Narrative exposition is the insertion of background information within a story or narrative. This information can be about the setting, characters' backstories, prior plot events, historical context, etc. In literature, exposition appears in the form of expository writing embedded within the narrative. Exposition is one of four rhetorical modes (also known as modes of discourse), along with description, persuasion, and narration, as elucidated by Alexander Bain and John Genung.
  • Three-act structure Dramatic structure
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    The three-act structure is a model used in narrative fiction that divides a story into three parts (acts), often called the Setup, the Confrontation, and the Resolution. It has been described in different ways by Aelius Donatus in the fourth century A.D. and by Syd Field in his 1979 book Screenplay: The Foundations of Screenwriting.
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