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Media formats

This list has 15 sub-lists and 12 members. See also Mass media technology, Mass media by type
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Animation
Animation 34 L, 20 T
Television
Television 27 L, 7 T
Film
Film 23 L, 25 T
Radio formats
Radio formats 22 L, 105 T
Podcasting
Podcasting 10 L, 10 T
Video
Video 25 L, 19 T
Books
Books 54 L, 3 T
Comics formats
Comics formats 3 L, 24 T
Book formats
Book formats 4 L, 13 T
Film formats
Film formats 1 L, 13 T
Radio broadcasting
Radio broadcasting 21 L, 27 T
  • Movies
    Movies Sequence of images that give the impression of movement, stored on film stock
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    rank #1 · WDW 2k 1 13
    Film, also called movie or motion picture or The Seventh Art, is a visual art used to simulate experiences that communicate ideas, stories, perceptions, feelings, beauty or atmosphere by the means of recorded or programmed moving images along with other sensory stimulations. The word "cinema", short for cinematography, is often used to refer to filmmaking and the film industry, and to the art form that is the result of it.
  • Television
    Television Telecommunication medium for transmitting and receiving moving images
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    rank #2 · 1
    Television (TV), sometimes shortened to tele or telly, is a telecommunication medium used for transmitting moving images in monochrome (black and white), or in color, and in two or three dimensions and sound. The term can refer to a television set, a television program ("TV show"), or the medium of television transmission. Television is a mass medium for advertising, entertainment and news.
  • Album
    Album Collection of recorded music, words, sounds
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    rank #3 · 1
    An album is a collection of audio recordings issued as a collection on compact disc (CD), vinyl, audio tape, or another medium. Albums of recorded music were developed in the early 20th century as individual 78-rpm records collected in a bound book resembling a photograph album; this format evolved after 1948 into single vinyl LP records played at ​33 ⁄3 rpm. Vinyl LPs are still issued, though album sales in the 21st-century have mostly focused on CD and MP3 formats. The audio cassette was a format widely used alongside vinyl from the 1970s into the first decade of the 2000s.
  • Betamax
    Betamax Consumer-level analog video tape recording and cassette form factor standard
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    rank #4 ·
    Betamax (also called Beta, as in its logo) is a consumer-level analog-recording and cassette format of magnetic tape for video. It was developed by Sony and was released in Japan on May 10, 1975. The first Betamax device introduced in the United States was the LV-1901 console, which included a 19-inch (48 cm) color monitor, and appeared in stores in early November 1975. The cassettes contain 0.50-inch-wide (12.7 mm) videotape in a design similar to that of the earlier, professional 0.75-inch-wide (19 mm), U-matic format. Betamax is obsolete, having lost the videotape format war to VHS. Despite this, Betamax recorders would not be discontinued until 2002, while new Betamax cassettes were available until March 2016, when Sony stopped making and selling them.
  • Internet radio
    Internet radio Digital audio service transmitted via the Internet
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    rank #5 ·
    Internet radio (also web radio, net radio, streaming radio, e-radio, IP radio, online radio) is a digital audio service transmitted via the Internet. Broadcasting on the Internet is usually referred to as webcasting since it is not transmitted broadly through wireless means. It can either be used as a stand-alone device running through the internet, or as a software running through a single computer.
  • Book
    Book Medium for recording information in the form of writing or images
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    rank #6 · 2 1
    As a physical object, a book is a stack of usually rectangular pages (made of papyrus, parchment, vellum, or paper) oriented with one edge tied, sewn, or otherwise fixed together and then bound to the flexible spine of a protective cover of heavier, relatively inflexible material. The technical term for this physical arrangement is codex (in the plural, codices). In the history of hand-held physical supports for extended written compositions or records, the codex replaces its immediate predecessor, the scroll. A single sheet in a codex is a leaf, and each side of a leaf is a page.
  • Video
    Video Electronic moving image
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    rank #7 ·
    Video is an electronic medium for the recording, copying, playback, broadcasting, and display of moving visual media. Video was first developed for mechanical television systems, which were quickly replaced by cathode ray tube (CRT) systems which were later replaced by flat panel displays of several types.
  • Newspaper
    Newspaper Scheduled publication containing news of events, articles, features, editorials, and advertising
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    rank #8 ·
    A newspaper is a periodical publication containing written information about current events and is often typed in black ink with a white or gray background.
  • Podcast
    Podcast Type of digital media
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    rank #9 ·
    A podcast or generically netcast, is an episodic series of digital audio or video files which a user can download to listen. Alternatively, the word "podcast" may refer to the individual component of such a series or to an individual media file. Compare "pod".
  • Novel
    Novel Narrative text, normally of a substantial length and in the form of prose describing a fictional and sequential story
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    rank #10 ·
    A novel is a relatively long work of narrative fiction, normally written in prose form, and which is typically published as a book. The present English word for a long work of prose fiction derives from the Italian novella for "new", "news", or "short story of something new", itself from the Latin novella, a singular noun use of the neuter plural of novellus, diminutive of novus, meaning "new". Walter Scott made a distinction between the novel, in which (as he saw it) "events are accommodated to the ordinary train of human events and the modern state of society" and the romance, which he defined as "a fictitious narrative in prose or verse; the interest of which turns upon marvellous and uncommon incidents". However, many such romances, including the historical romances of Scott, Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights and Herman Melville's Moby-Dick, are also frequently called novels, and Scott describes romance as a "kindred term". This sort of romance is in turn different from the genre fiction love romance or romance novel. Other European languages do not distinguish between romance and novel: "a novel is le roman, der Roman, il romanzo, en roman." Most European languages use the word "romance" (as in French, Dutch, Russian, Slovene, Serbo-Croatian, Romanian, Danish, Swedish and Norwegian "roman"; Finnish "romaani"; German "Roman"; Portuguese "romance" and Italian "romanzo") for extended narratives.
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