United States Senators from New York

Posted May 4, 2011
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  1. Hillary Clinton
    #1

    Hillary Clinton

    67,438 views

    Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is an American politician who served as the 67th United States Secretary of State under President Barack Obama from 2009 to 2013. She is the wife of the 42nd President of the United States Bill Clinton, and was First Lady of the United States during his tenure from 1993 to 2001. Clinton subsequently served as a United States Senator from New York from 2001 to 2009, and is a candidate for President of the United States in the 2016 presidential election.


  2. Robert F. Kennedy
    #2

    Robert F. Kennedy

    33,937 views

    Robert Francis "Bobby" Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), commonly known by his initials RFK, was an American politician from Massachusetts. He served as a Senator for New York from 1965 until his assassination in 1968. He was previously the 64th U.S. Attorney General from 1961 to 1964, serving under his older brother, President John F. Kennedy and his successor, President Lyndon B. Johnson. An icon of modern American liberalism and member of the Democratic Party, Kennedy was a leading candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination in the 1968 election.


  3. Alfonse D'amato
    #3

    Alfonse D'amato

    1,577 views

    Alfonse Marcello "Al" D'Amato (born August 1, 1937) is an American lawyer and former New York politician. A Republican, he served as United States Senator from New York from 1981 to 1999. He subsequently founded a lobbying firm, Park Strategies.


  4. Martin Van Buren
    #4

    Martin Van Buren

    279 views

    Martin Van Buren (Dutch: Maarten van Buren pronunciation ; December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862) was an American politician who served as the eighth President of the United States (1837–1841). A member of the Democratic Party, he served in a number of senior roles, including eighth Vice President (1833–1837) and Secretary of State (1829–1831), both under Andrew Jackson. Van Buren's inability as president to deal with the economic chaos of the Panic of 1837 and with the surging Whig Party led to his defeat in the 1840 election.


  5. Daniel Patrick Moynihan
    #5

    Daniel Patrick Moynihan

    241 views

    Daniel Patrick Moynihan (March 16, 1927 – March 26, 2003) was an American politician and sociologist. A member of the Democratic Party, he was first elected to the United States Senate for New York in 1976, and was re-elected three times (in 1982, 1988, and 1994). He declined to run for re-election in 2000. Prior to his years in the Senate, Moynihan was the United States' Ambassador to the United Nations and to India, and was a member of four successive presidential administrations, beginning with the administration of John F. Kennedy, and continuing through that of Gerald Ford.


  6. Kirsten Gillibrand
    #6

    Kirsten Gillibrand

    151 views

    Kirsten Elizabeth Rutnik Gillibrand (/ˈkɪərstən ˈɪlɨbrænd/ KEER-stən JIL-ə-brand; born December 9, 1966) is an American politician and the junior United States Senator from New York, in office since 2009. Previously, she served in the United States House of Representatives, representing New York's 20th congressional district (2007–09). She is a member of the Democratic Party.


  7. Aaron Burr
    #7

    Aaron Burr

    65 views

    Aaron Burr, Jr. (February 6, 1756 – September 14, 1836) was an American politician. He was the third Vice President of the United States (1801–1805); he served during President Thomas Jefferson's first term.


  8. Robert F. Wagner
    #8

    Robert F. Wagner

    48 views

    Robert Ferdinand Wagner I (June 8, 1877 – May 4, 1953) was an American politician. He was a Democratic U.S. Senator from New York from 1927 to 1949. Working closely in the state legislature with fellow New York City Democrat Al Smith, Wagner embraced reform in the 1910s and 1920s, especially to the benefit of their core constituency, the working class. They built a coalition for these reforms that embraced unions, social workers, some businessmen, and numerous middle-class activists and civic reform organizations across the state. As Senator, Wagner was a leader of the New Deal Coalition putting special emphasis on supporting the labor movement. He sponsored three major laws: the National Labor Relations Act of 1935, the Social Security Act of 1935, and the Public Housing Act of 1937. His son, Robert F. Wagner, Jr. was mayor of New York from 1954 through 1965.


  9. William M. Evarts
    #9

    William M. Evarts

    39 views

    William Maxwell Evarts (February 6, 1818 – February 28, 1901) was an American lawyer and statesman who served as U.S. Secretary of State, U.S. Attorney General and U.S. Senator from New York. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Jeremiah Evarts, an author, editor, and Indian removal opponent; and the grandson of Declaration of Independence signer Roger Sherman.


  10. James L. Buckley
    #10

    James L. Buckley

    33 views

    James Lane Buckley (born March 9, 1923) is a judge for the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. He served as a United States Senator from the state of New York as a member of the Conservative Party of New York from January 3, 1971 to January 3, 1977. He was vice president and director of the Catawba Corporation from 1953 to 1970, and also served as Undersecretary of State for Security Assistance 1981–1982, as well as President of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc. 1982–1985.


  11. John Foster Dulles
    #11

    John Foster Dulles

    40 views

    John Foster Dulles (/ˈdʌləs/; February 25, 1888 – May 24, 1959) served as U.S. Secretary of State under Republican President Dwight D. Eisenhower from 1953 to 1959. He was a significant figure in the early Cold War era, advocating an aggressive stance against Communism throughout the world. He negotiated numerous treaties and alliances that reflected this point of view. He advocated support of the French in their war against the Viet Minh in Indochina but rejected the Geneva Accords that France and the Communists agreed to, and instead supported South Vietnam after the Geneva Conference in 1954.


  12. Hamilton Fish
    #12

    Hamilton Fish

    38 views

    Hamilton Fish (August 3, 1808 – September 7, 1893) was an American statesman and politician who served as the 16th Governor of New York, a United States Senator and United States Secretary of State. Fish is considered one of the best Secretaries of State in the United States' history, as he is known for his judiciousness and efforts towards reform during the Grant Administration. Fish settled the controversial Alabama Claims with Great Britain through his development of the concept of international arbitration. Fish kept the United States out of war with Spain over Cuban independence by coolly handling the volatile Virginius Incident. In 1875, Fish initiated the process that would ultimately lead to Hawaiian statehood, by having negotiated a reciprocal trade treaty for the island nation's sugar production. He also organized a peace conference and treaty in Washington D.C. between South American countries and Spain. Fish worked with James Milton Turner, America's first African American consul, to settle the Liberian-Grebo war. President Grant stated that Hamilton Fish was the person whom he most trusted for political advice.


  13. Rufus King
    #13

    Rufus King

    28 views

    Rufus King (March 24, 1755 – April 29, 1827) was an American lawyer, politician, and diplomat. He was a delegate for Massachusetts to the Continental Congress. He also attended the Constitutional Convention and was one of the signers of the United States Constitution on September 17, 1787, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He represented New York in the United States Senate, served as Minister to Britain, and was the Federalist candidate for both Vice President (1804 and 1808) and President of the United States (1816).


  14. Elihu Root
    #14

    Elihu Root

    27 views

    Elihu Root (/ˈɛlɨhjuː ˈrt/; February 15, 1845 – February 7, 1937) was an American lawyer and statesman who served as the Secretary of War (1899–1904) under two presidents, including President Theodore Roosevelt. He was the prototype of the 20th century revolving door, shuttled between high-level appointed government positions in Washington, D.C. and private-sector legal practice in New York City. He was elected by the state legislature as a US Senator from New York and served one term, 1909–1915. Root was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1912.


  15. Chauncey Depew
    #15

    Chauncey Depew

    26 views

    Chauncey Mitchell Depew (April 23, 1834 – April 5, 1928) was an attorney for Cornelius Vanderbilt's railroad interests, president of the New York Central Railroad System, and a United States Senator from New York from 1899 to 1911.


  16. David B. Hill
    #16

    David B. Hill

    23 views

    David Bennett Hill (August 29, 1843 – October 20, 1910) was an American politician from New York who was the 29th Governor of New York from 1885 to 1891.


  17. Gouverneur Morris
    #17

    Gouverneur Morris

    22 views

    Gouverneur Morris I (January 31, 1752 – November 6, 1816) was an American statesman, a Founding Father of the United States, and a native of New York City who represented Pennsylvania in the Constitutional Convention of 1787. He was a signatory to the Articles of Confederation. Morris was also an author of large sections of the Constitution of the United States and one of its signers. He is widely credited as the author of the document's preamble, and has been called the "Penman of the Constitution." In an era when most Americans thought of themselves as citizens of their respective states, Morris advanced the idea of being a citizen of a single union of states.


  18. Jacob K. Javits
    #18

    Jacob K. Javits

    24 views

    Jacob Koppel "Jake" Javits (May 18, 1904 – March 7, 1986) was an American politician who served as a United States Senator from New York from 1957 to 1981. He was a liberal Republican who served in Congress for 30 years. He was allied with Governor Nelson Rockefeller, and fellow Senators Irving Ives and Kenneth Keating. A maverick, Javits joined the Republican Party in a favorable response to Fiorello La Guardia and in reaction to Tammany Hall's efforts to control votes. He was elected to the Senate in 1956 where he served until 1981, following terms of service in the House of Representatives and as Attorney General for the State of New York.


  19. John Armstrong, Jr.
    #19

    John Armstrong, Jr.

    21 views

    John Armstrong, Jr. (November 25, 1758 – April 1, 1843) was an American soldier and statesman who was a delegate to the Continental Congress, U.S. Senator from New York, and Secretary of War.


  20. DeWitt Clinton
    #20

    DeWitt Clinton

    26 views

    DeWitt Clinton (March 2, 1769 – February 11, 1828) was an American politician and naturalist who served as a United States Senator and was the sixth Governor of New York. In this last capacity, he was largely responsible for the construction of the Erie Canal. Clinton was the leader of New York's People's Party and was a major rival of Martin Van Buren, who was the Attorney General of New York during Clinton's governorship. Clinton believed that infrastructure improvements could transform American life, drive economic growth, and encourage political participation; and he heavily influenced the development of the New York State and the United States.


  21. Chuck Schumer
    #21

    Chuck Schumer

    18 views

    Charles Ellis "Chuck" Schumer (/ˈʃmər/; born November 23, 1950) is the senior United States Senator from New York and a member of the Democratic Party. First elected in 1998, he defeated three-term Republican incumbent Al D'Amato by a margin of 55%–44%. Schumer was re-elected in 2004 by a margin of 71%–24% and in 2010 by a margin of 66%–33%.


  22. Edward Murphy
    #22

    Edward Murphy

    20 views

    Edward B. "Ted" Murphy (born October 30, 1971 in West Newton, Massachusetts) is an American rower.


  23. James Wolcott Wadsworth, Jr.
    #23

    James Wolcott Wadsworth, Jr.

    17 views

    James Wolcott Wadsworth, Jr. (August 12, 1877 – June 21, 1952) was a U.S. Republican politician from New York. He was the son of New York State Comptroller James Wolcott Wadsworth, Sr., and the grandson of Union General James Samuel Wadsworth, Sr.


  24. William H. Seward
    #24

    William H. Seward

    14 views

    William Henry Seward (May 16, 1801 – October 10, 1872) was United States Secretary of State from 1861 to 1869, and earlier served as Governor of New York and United States Senator. A determined opponent of the spread of slavery in the years leading up to the American Civil War, he was a dominant figure in the Republican Party in its formative years. Although regarded as the leading contender for the party's presidential nomination in 1860, he was defeated by Abraham Lincoln.


  25. William North
    #25

    William North

    13 views

    William North (1755 – January 3, 1836) was an American soldier and politician.


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