United States Senators from Mississippi

Posted 4 years ago
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  1. Trent Lott

    Trent Lott


    Chester Trent Lott, Sr. (born October 9, 1941) is an American politician. A former United States Senator from Mississippi, Lott served in numerous leadership positions in both the United States House of Representatives and the Senate. He entered Congress as one of the first of a wave of Republicans winning seats in Southern states that had been solidly Democratic. He became Senate Majority Leader, then fell from power after praising Strom Thurmond's 1948 segregationist Dixiecrat presidential bid.

  2. Jefferson Davis

    Jefferson Davis


    Jefferson Finis Davis (June 3, 1807/1808 – December 6, 1889) was an American soldier and politician who was the President of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War (1861–1865). He took personal charge of the Confederate war plans but was unable to find a strategy to defeat the more populous and industrialized Union. His diplomatic efforts failed to gain recognition from any foreign country. At home he paid little attention to the collapsing Confederate economy; the government printed more and more paper money to cover the war's expenses, leading to runaway inflation and devaluation of the Confederate dollar.

  3. Adelbert Ames

    Adelbert Ames


    Adelbert Ames (October 31, 1835 – April 13, 1933) was an American sailor, soldier, and politician. He served with distinction as a Union Army general during the American Civil War. As a Radical Republican, he was military governor, Senator and civilian governor in Reconstruction-era Mississippi. In 1898 he served as a United States Army general during the Spanish–American War.

  4. John C. Stennis

    John C. Stennis


    John Cornelius Stennis (August 3, 1901 – April 23, 1995) was a U.S. Senator from the state of Mississippi. He was a Democrat who served in the Senate for over 41 years, becoming its most senior member for his last eight years. He retired from the Senate in 1989.

  5. Lucius Quintus Cincinatus Lamar II

    Lucius Quintus Cincinatus Lamar II


    Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar (September 17, 1825 – January 23, 1893) was an American politician and jurist from Mississippi. A United States Representative and Senator, he also served as United States Secretary of the Interior in the first administration of President Grover Cleveland, as well as an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.

  6. Edward C. Walthall

    Edward C. Walthall


    Edward Cary Walthall (April 4, 1831 – April 21, 1898) was a general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War and a postbellum United States Senator from Mississippi.

  7. Hiram Rhodes Revels

    Hiram Rhodes Revels


    Hiram Rhodes Revels (September 27, 1827 – January 16, 1901) was a minister in the African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME), a Republican politician, and college administrator. Born free in North Carolina, he later lived and worked in Ohio, where he voted before the Civil War. He was elected as the first African American to serve in the United States Senate, and was the first African American to serve in the U.S. Congress. He represented Mississippi in the Senate in 1870 and 1871 during the Reconstruction era.

  8. Thomas Buck Reed

    Thomas Buck Reed


    Thomas Buck Reed (May 7, 1787 – November 26, 1829) was a United States Senator from Mississippi.

  9. Anselm J. McLaurin

    Anselm J. McLaurin


    Anselm Joseph McLaurin (March 26, 1848 – December 22, 1909) was the 34th Governor of Mississippi, serving from 1896 to 1900.

  10. Thomas Hill Williams

    Thomas Hill Williams


    Thomas Hill Williams (1780 – 1840) was a senator from Mississippi. Born in North Carolina, he completed preparatory studies, studied law, was admitted to the bar and practiced. He was register of the land office for the Territory of Mississippi in 1805, secretary of the Territory in 1805, and Acting Governor in 1806. He was reappointed secretary in 1807, and was again Acting Governor in 1809. In 1810 he was collector of customs at New Orleans, and was a delegate to the State constitutional convention.

  11. Robert J. Walker

    Robert J. Walker


    Robert John Walker (July 19, 1801 – November 11, 1869) was an American economist and statesman.

  12. James Eastland

    James Eastland


    James Oliver Eastland (November 28, 1904 – February 19, 1986) was an American politician and white supremacist from Mississippi who served in the United States Senate as a Democrat in 1941; and again from 1943 until his resignation December 27, 1978. From 1947 to 1978, he served alongside John Stennis, also a Democrat. At the time, Eastland and Stennis were the longest-serving Senate duo in American history, though their record was subsequently surpassed by Strom Thurmond and Ernest Hollings of South Carolina, who served together for thirty-six years. Eastland was also the most senior member of the Senate at the time of his retirement in 1978. He compiled a conservative record in support of the Conservative coalition. A wealthy plantation owner, Eastland was best known nationally as a symbol of Southern support of racial segregation in most of his years in the Senate.

  13. James K. Vardaman

    James K. Vardaman


    James Kimble Vardaman (July 26, 1861 – June 25, 1930) was an American politician from the state of Mississippi, serving as Governor of Mississippi from 1904 to 1908 and in the U.S. Senate from 1913 to 1919. Vardaman, known as "The Great White Chief", advocated white supremacy. He said "if it is necessary every Negro in the state will be lynched; it will be done to maintain white supremacy."

  14. Theodore G. Bilbo

    Theodore G. Bilbo


    Theodore Gilmore Bilbo (October 13, 1877 – August 21, 1947) was an American politician. Bilbo, a Democrat, twice served as governor of Mississippi (1916–20, 1928–32) and later was elected a U.S. Senator (1935–47). A master of filibuster and scathing rhetoric, a rough-and-tumble fighter in debate, he made his name a synonym for white supremacy. Bilbo believed that black people and Jews were inferior, defended segregation, and was a member of the Ku Klux Klan.

  15. James L. Alcorn

    James L. Alcorn


    James Lusk Alcorn (November 4, 1816 – December 19, 1894) was a prominent American political figure in Mississippi during the 19th century. He was a leading southern white Republican during Reconstruction in Mississippi, where he served as governor and U.S. Senator. A moderate Republican, he had a bitter rivalry with Radical Republican carpetbagger Adelbert Ames, who defeated him in the 1873 Mississippi gubernatorial race. He briefly served as a brigadier general of Mississippi state troops at times in Confederate States Army service during the early part of the American Civil War. Among the Confederate generals who joined the post-Civil War Republican Party, only James Longstreet had been of higher-rank.

  16. Thad Cochran

    Thad Cochran


    William Thad Cochran (born December 7, 1937) is a member of the Republican Party. As of 2015 he was the senior United States Senator from Mississippi (the third most-senior Senator and the second most-senior Republican member), first elected to the Senate in 1978, and the Chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, which he had also chaired from 2005 to 2007. He also chaired the Senate Agriculture Committee from 2003 to 2005. Cochran won reelection to a seventh term in 2014, after defeating Chris McDaniel in an intense primary run-off election.

  17. Stephen Adams

    Stephen Adams


    Stephen Adams (born 1937) is an American businessman, private equity investor, and philanthropist. His current holdings include Good Sam Enterprises, a national publishing, retail stores, and member-based direct marketing organization directed toward owners of recreational vehicles and Adams Outdoor Advertising, an operator of outdoor advertising structures in the Midwest, Southeast, and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. His previous holdings have included operators of television and radio stations, print publishers, cola bottlers and community banks.

  18. Blanche Bruce

    Blanche Bruce


    Blanche Kelso Bruce (March 1, 1841 – March 17, 1898) was a U.S. politician who represented Mississippi as a Republican in the U.S. Senate from 1875 to 1881; of mixed race, he was the first elected black senator to serve a full term. Hiram R. Revels, also of Mississippi, was the first African American to serve in the U.S. Senate, but did not serve a full term.

  19. Henry S. Foote

    Henry S. Foote


    Henry Stuart Foote (February 28, 1804 – May 20, 1880) was a United States Senator from Mississippi from 1847 to 1852 and elected on a Unionist ticket as Governor of Mississippi from 1852 to 1854. His strong leadership on the Senate floor helped secure passage of the Compromise of 1850, which for a time averted a civil war in the United States. A practicing attorney, he published two memoirs related to the Civil War years, as well as a book on Texas prior to its annexation, and a postwar book on the legal profession and courts in the South.

  20. Roger Wicker

    Roger Wicker


    Roger Frederick Wicker (born July 5, 1951) is an American politician and member of the Republican Party who serves as the junior United States Senator from Mississippi, in office since 2007.

  21. John Henderson (Mississippi politician)

    John Henderson (Mississippi politician)


    John Henderson (February 28, 1797 – September 15, 1857) was a lawyer and U.S. Senator from Mississippi.

  22. John J. McRae

    John J. McRae


    John Jones McCrae (January 10, 1815 – May 31, 1868) was an American Democratic politician.

  23. Albert G. Brown

    Albert G. Brown


    Albert Gallatin Brown (May 31, 1813 – June 12, 1880) was Governor of Mississippi from 1844 to 1848 and a United States Senator from Mississippi from 1854 through 1861 when he withdrew. In 1829, Brown entered Mississippi College, but soon transferred to Jefferson College, which he attended for about six months. He was a Democrat.

  24. George Poindexter

    George Poindexter


    George Poindexter (1779 – September 5, 1853) was an American politician, lawyer and judge from Mississippi. Born in Virginia, he moved to the Mississippi Territory in 1802. He served as United States Representative from the newly admitted state, was elected as Governor (1820-1822), and served as a United States Senator.

  25. Powhatan Ellis

    Powhatan Ellis


    Powhatan Ellis (January 17, 1790 – March 18, 1863) was a United States Senator from Mississippi and a United States federal judge.

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