Tuck School of Business faculty

Posted May 30, 2011
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This list has 14 members.

  1. Frederick Winslow Taylor
    #1

    Frederick Winslow Taylor

    47 views

    Frederick Winslow Taylor (March 20, 1856 – March 21, 1915) was an American mechanical engineer who sought to improve industrial efficiency. He was one of the first management consultants. Taylor was one of the intellectual leaders of the Efficiency Movement and his ideas, broadly conceived, were highly influential in the Progressive Era (1890s-1920s). Taylor summed up his efficiency techniques in his 1911 book The Principles of Scientific Management. His pioneering work in applying engineering principles to the work done on the factory floor was instrumental in the creation and development of the branch of engineering that is now known as industrial engineering. Taylor was also an athlete who competed nationally in tennis and golf.


  2. Hermon Hosmer Scott
    #2

    Hermon Hosmer Scott

    9 views

    Hermon Hosmer Scott (March 28, 1909 - April 13, 1975) was a pioneer in the Hi-Fi industry and founder of H.H. Scott, Inc..


  3. Kevin Lane Keller
    #3

    Kevin Lane Keller

    5 views

    Kevin Lane Keller (born June 23, 1956) is the E. B. Osborn Professor of Marketing at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. He is most notable for having authored Strategic Brand Management (Prentice Hall, 1998, 2002, 2008 and 2012), a widely used text on brand management. The book is focused on the "how to" and "why" of brand management, this strategy guide provides specific tactical guidelines for planning, building, measuring, and managing brand equity. He has published his research in the Journal of Marketing, Journal of Marketing Research, and Journal of Consumer Research. In addition, Philip Kotler selected Keller to be his co-author on the most recent edition of Kotler's market-leading text Marketing Management.


  4. Brian Wansink
    #4

    Brian Wansink

    6 views

    Brian Wansink (born 1960) is an American professor in the fields of consumer behavior and nutritional science. He is a former Executive Director of the USDA's Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion (CNPP) (2007–2009), and now holds the John S. Dyson Endowed Chair in the Applied Economics and Management Department at Cornell University, where he is director of the Food and Brand Lab.


  5. Ed Hall
    #5

    Ed Hall

    4 views

    Edward Kimball "E. K." Hall (June 9, 1870 – November 10, 1932) was an American football and baseball player and coach, college athletics administrator, lawyer, and business executive. He played college football at Dartmouth College from 1889 to 1891 and then served as the athletic director and head football and baseball coach at the University of Illinois from 1892 to 1894.


  6. Vijay Govindarajan
    #6

    Vijay Govindarajan

    2 views

    Vijay Govindarajan (Vee-jay go-vin-da-RAH-jin)), a New York Times and Wall Street Journal Best Selling Author, is Coxe Distinguished Professor at Dartmouth College's Tuck School of Business and Marvin Bower Fellow at Harvard Business School. The Coxe Distinguished Professor is a new Dartmouth-wide faculty chair. Govindarajan worked as General Electric first chief innovation consultant and professor in residence from 2008-10. While working at GE, Govindarajan co-authored a paper entitled "How GE Is Disrupting Itself" with Chris Trimble and GE's CEO Jeffrey Immelt."How GE Is Disrupting Itself," which introduced the idea of reverse innovation, outlines GE's attempts to embrace reverse innovation and gives reasons why companies, like GE, need to invest in these types of innovations, rather than just glocalization, readily in the current area of globalization. Govindarajan's writing has been published in news sources such as The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post and the The Economic Times. Govindarajan is the author of a blog featured by the Harvard Business Review where he discusses topics like reverse innovation and global business issues. He is also the author for a column on innovation that is published by BusinessWeek. Govindarajan, along with Christian Sarkar, published a blog post on the Harvard Business Review presenting the idea of developing a $300 house that would replace the dilapidated residences of impoverished people around the world. The Economist noted that "the blog was so inundated with positive responses that a dedicated website, 300house.com, was set up, which has attracted more than 900 enthusiasts and advisers from all over the world."


  7. Matthew J. Slaughter
    #7

    Matthew J. Slaughter

    2 views

    Dr. Matthew J. Slaughter is an American economist and former member of the Council of Economic Advisers. He is considered an expert in the area of globalization and his work has been supported by organizations such as the National Science Foundation and the Russell Sage Foundation. Slaughter is also a Professor of International Economics at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. He is also currently a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research; a Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations; an academic advisor to the McKinsey Global Institute; a member of the academic advisory boards of the International Tax Policy Forum and the Tuck Center for Private Equity; and the Senior Associate Director of the Tuck Center for International Business.


  8. Kenneth French
    #8

    Kenneth French

    3 views

    Kenneth Ronald "Ken" French (born March 10, 1954) is the Roth Family Distinguished Professor of Finance at the Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth College. He has previously been a faculty member at MIT, the Yale School of Management, and the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. He is most famous for his work on asset pricing with Eugene Fama. They wrote a series of papers, that cast doubt on the validity of the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM), which posits that a stock's beta alone should explain its average return. These papers describe two factors above and beyond a stock's market beta which can explain differences in stock returns: market capitalization and "value". They also offer evidence that a variety of patterns in average returns, often labeled as "anomalies" in past work, can be explained with their Fama–French three-factor model.


  9. Mariann Jelinek
    #9

    Mariann Jelinek

    0 views

    Mariann Jelinek (born 1942) is an American organizational theorist, and Emeritus Professor of Strategy at the College of William & Mary, known for her contributions in the field of Management of technology and innovation.


  10. Frederick Taylor (golfer)
    #10

    Frederick Taylor (golfer)

    0 views

    Frederick Winslow Taylor (March 20, 1856 – March 21, 1915) was an American mechanical engineer who sought to improve industrial efficiency. He was one of the first management consultants. Taylor was one of the intellectual leaders of the Efficiency Movement and his ideas, broadly conceived, were highly influential in the Progressive Era (1890s-1920s). Taylor summed up his efficiency techniques in his 1911 book The Principles of Scientific Management. His pioneering work in applying engineering principles to the work done on the factory floor was instrumental in the creation and development of the branch of engineering that is now known as industrial engineering. Taylor was also an athlete who competed nationally in tennis and golf.


  11. Rafael La Porta
    #11

    Rafael La Porta

    1 view

    Rafael La Porta is the Nobel Foundation Professor of Finance at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. La Porta received his A.B. in economics at Universidad Catolica de Buenos Aries in Argentina and his A.M. and Ph.D. in economics at Harvard University in Cambridge, MA. La Porta served as a professor of economics at Harvard before accepting a position at Tuck. His research is primarily in corporate governance and investor protections across the world. He is the coauthor of the influential article "Law and Finance," which appeared in the Journal of Political Economy in December of 1998.


  12. M. Eric Johnson
    #12

    M. Eric Johnson

    0 views

    M. Eric Johnson is a Professor of Operations Management at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, United States. He is also Director of the Glassmeyer/McNamee Center for Digital Strategies. He joined the Tuck School faculty in 1999. Prior to coming to Tuck, he was a professor at management at Vanderbilt University and a development engineer at Hewlett-Packard.


  13. Richard D'Aveni
    #13

    Richard D'Aveni

    1 view

    Richard A. D'Aveni is Professor of Strategic Management at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. Hanover, New Hampshire, USA


  14. Andrew Bernard
    #14

    Andrew Bernard

    0 views

    Andrew B. Bernard (born June 20, 1963) is an American economist, currently the Jack Byrne Professor of International Economics at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, United States.He has been on the faculty at Tuck since 1999. He received his A.B. from Harvard and his Ph.D. from Stanford University in economics in 1991 and was on the faculty at MIT and Yale School of Management prior to coming to Tuck.




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