New York Yankees Opening Day starting pitchers

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  1. Carl Pavano

    Carl Pavano


    Carl Anthony Pavano (born January 8, 1976) is an American former professional baseball player. A right-handed pitcher, Pavano played in Major League Baseball from 1998 to 2012 for the Montreal Expos, Florida Marlins, New York Yankees, Cleveland Indians, and Minnesota Twins. He was a member of the 2003 World Series champions and appeared in the 2004 Major League Baseball All-Star Game.

  2. Roger Clemens

    Roger Clemens


    William Roger Clemens (born August 4, 1962), nicknamed "Rocket", is a retired American baseball pitcher who played 24 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for four teams. Clemens was one of the most dominant pitchers in major league history, tallying 354 wins, a 3.12 earned run average (ERA), and 4,672 strikeouts, the third-most all time. An 11-time All-Star and two-time World Series champion, he won seven Cy Young Awards during his career, the most of any pitcher in history. Clemens was known for his fierce competitive nature and hard-throwing pitching style, which he used to intimidate batters.

  3. Andy Pettitte

    Andy Pettitte


    Andrew Eugene "Andy" Pettitte (/ˈpɛtɪt/; born June 15, 1972) is an American former baseball starting pitcher who played 18 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB), primarily for the New York Yankees. He also pitched for the Houston Astros. Pettitte won five World Series championships with the Yankees and was a three-time All-Star. He ranks as MLB's all-time postseason wins leader with 19.

  4. Randy Johnson

    Randy Johnson


    Randall David "Randy" Johnson (born September 10, 1963), nicknamed "The Big Unit", is an American former left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played from 1988 to 2009 for six teams, primarily the Seattle Mariners and Arizona Diamondbacks. His 303 career victories rank as the fifth-most by a lefthander in major league history, while his 4,875 strikeouts place him second all-time behind Nolan Ryan and are the most by a lefthander. He holds five of the seven highest single-season strikeout totals by a lefthander in modern history. Johnson won the Cy Young Award five times, second only to Roger Clemens' seven; he is one of two pitchers to win the award four consecutive times (1999-2002), and in 1999 – along with Pedro Martínez – joined Gaylord Perry in the rare feat of winning the award in both the American and National Leagues. He is also one of five pitchers to hurl no-hitters in both leagues; with the second no-hitter, in 2004, he became the oldest pitcher in major league history to throw a perfect game. He is one of the few pitchers in history to record a win against all 30 MLB franchises.

  5. Mike Mussina

    Mike Mussina


    Michael Cole Mussina (born December 8, 1968), nicknamed Moose, is a former Major League Baseball right-handed starting pitcher. Mussina played for the Baltimore Orioles (1991–2000) and the New York Yankees (2001–2008).

  6. C.C. Sabathia

    C.C. Sabathia


    Carsten Charles "CC" Sabathia, Jr. (born July 21, 1980) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball (MLB). Upon signing with the Yankees prior to the 2009 season, Sabathia became the highest-paid pitcher in MLB history. Currently in his 15th year as a major league pitcher, Sabathia had never had more losses than wins in a season before 2014. He is listed at 6'7" and 290 pounds.

  7. David Cone

    David Cone


    David Brian Cone (born January 2, 1963) is an American former Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher, and current color commentator for the New York Yankees on the YES Network. A third round draft pick of the Kansas City Royals in 1981 MLB, he made his MLB debut in 1986. During a 17-year baseball career, he pitched until 2003 for five different teams. Cone batted left-handed and threw right-handed.

  8. Tommy John

    Tommy John


    Thomas Edward John Jr. (born May 22, 1943) is a former pitcher in Major League Baseball whose 288 career victories rank as the seventh highest total among left-handers in major league history. He is also known for the revolutionary surgery, now named after him, which was performed on a damaged ligament in his pitching arm. Well over half of John's career wins came after his surgery.

  9. Ron Guidry

    Ron Guidry


    Ronald Ames Guidry (/ˈɡɪdri/; born August 28, 1950), nicknamed "Louisiana Lightning" and "Gator", is a former Major League Baseball left-handed pitcher. He played his entire 14-year baseball career for the New York Yankees of the American League (AL), from 1975 through 1988. Guidry was also the pitching coach of the Yankees from 2006 to 2007.

  10. Whitey Ford

    Whitey Ford


    Edward Charles "Whitey" Ford (born October 21, 1928) is an American former Major League Baseball pitcher who spent his entire 16-year career with the New York Yankees. He was voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974.

  11. Don Larsen

    Don Larsen


    Donald James Larsen (born August 7, 1929) is an American former Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher. During a 15-year MLB career, he pitched from 1953–1967 for seven different teams. Larsen pitched for the St. Louis Browns / Baltimore Orioles (1953–1954; 1965), New York Yankees (1955–1959), Kansas City Athletics (1960–1961), Chicago White Sox (1961), San Francisco Giants (1962–1964), Houston Colt .45's / Houston Astros (1964–1965), and Chicago Cubs (1967).

  12. Phil Niekro

    Phil Niekro


    Philip Henry "Phil" Niekro (born April 1, 1939), nicknamed "Knucksie", is a former Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1997. Niekro's 318 career victories are the most by a knuckleball pitcher and he ranks 16th on the overall all-time wins list. He also won the National League (NL) Gold Glove Award five times. Niekro pitched for 20 seasons for the Milwaukee and Atlanta Braves. During his tenure in Atlanta, Niekro was selected for five All-Star teams, led the league in victories twice and earned run average once. Niekro was also a key to the only two division titles Atlanta won before 1991.

  13. Jim Bouton

    Jim Bouton


    James Alan "Jim" Bouton (/ˈbtn/; born March 8, 1939) is an American retired professional baseball player. Bouton played in Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher for the New York Yankees, Seattle Pilots, Houston Astros, and Atlanta Braves between 1962 and 1978. He has also been a best-selling author, actor, activist, sportscaster and one of the creators of Big League Chew.

  14. Allie Reynolds

    Allie Reynolds


    Allie Pierce Reynolds (February 10, 1917 – December 26, 1994) was an American Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher. Reynolds pitched 13-years for the Cleveland Indians (1942–46) and New York Yankees (1947–54). A member of the Creek nation, Reynolds was nicknamed "Superchief".

  15. Lefty Gomez

    Lefty Gomez


    Vernon Louis "Lefty" Gomez (November 26, 1908 – February 17, 1989) was an American professional baseball player. A left-handed pitcher, Gomez played in Major League Baseball (MLB) between 1930 and 1943 for the New York Yankees and the Washington Senators. Gomez was a five-time World Series champion with the Yankees. He was also known for his colorful personality and humor throughout his career and life.

  16. Vic Raschi

    Vic Raschi


    Victor John Angelo "Vic" Raschi (March 28, 1919 – October 14, 1988) was a Major League Baseball pitcher. He was one of the top pitchers for the New York Yankees in the late 1940s and early 1950s, forming (with Allie Reynolds and Eddie Lopat) the "Big Three" of the Yankees' pitching staff. Later in his career, as a pitcher with the St. Louis Cardinals, he was responsible for allowing Hank Aaron's first career home run.

  17. Catfish Hunter

    Catfish Hunter


    James Augustus "Jim" or "Catfish" Hunter (April 8, 1946 – September 9, 1999) was a professional baseball player in Major League Baseball (MLB). From 1965 to 1979, he was a pitcher for the Kansas City Athletics, Oakland Athletics, and New York Yankees. Hunter was the first pitcher since 1915 to win 200 career games by the age of 31. He is often referred to as baseball's first big-money free agent. He was a member of five World Series championship teams.

  18. Doc Medich

    Doc Medich


    George Francis "Doc" Medich (born December 9, 1948), is a former professional baseball player who pitched in the Major Leagues from 1972-1982. He was a medical student at the University of Pittsburgh, and acquired the nickname "Doc" during his early baseball career.

  19. Hank Borowy

    Hank Borowy


    Henry Ludwig "Hank" Borowy (May 12, 1916 – August 23, 2004) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball. From 1942 through 1951, Borowy played for the New York Yankees (1942–45), Chicago Cubs (1945–48), Philadelphia Phillies (1949–50), Pittsburgh Pirates (1950) and Detroit Tigers (1950–51). He batted and threw right-handed.

  20. Doc Newton

    Doc Newton


    Eustace James Newton (October 26, 1877 – May 14, 1931) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher from Indianapolis, Indiana who played for several teams in both the National League and American League. A former Dentist, he finished with a 54–72 win-loss record, a 3.22 Earned Run Average, and 99 complete games. He had his best season in 1902 for Brooklyn, when he went 15-14 with a 2.42 ERA. From an article in the Sporting Life magazine from April 1907, he played college baseball for Morris Hall University, while others claim Morris Halo, or Morris Hale. The most likely match is Moores Hill College, a school that closed in 1915.

  21. Jimmy Key

    Jimmy Key


    James Edward "Jimmy" Key (born April 22, 1961) is a former left-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Toronto Blue Jays (1984–1992), New York Yankees (1993–1996), and Baltimore Orioles (1997–1998). His best personal years were in 1987, when he posted a 17–8 record with a league-leading 2.76 ERA, and in 1993, when he went 18–6 with a 3.00 ERA and 173 strikeouts.

  22. Ray Caldwell

    Ray Caldwell


    Raymond Benjamin Caldwell, (April 26, 1888 – August 17, 1967), was an American major league pitcher from 1910 to 1921. He was known for throwing the spitball, and he was one of the 17 pitchers allowed to continue throwing the pitch after it was outlawed in 1920.

  23. Bob Turley

    Bob Turley


    Robert Lee Turley (September 19, 1930 – March 30, 2013), known as "Bullet Bob", was an American professional baseball player and financial planner. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a pitcher from 1951 through 1963. After his retirement from baseball, he worked for Primerica Financial Services.

  24. Eddie Lopat

    Eddie Lopat


    Edmund Walter Lopat (originally Lopatynski) (June 21, 1918 – June 15, 1992) was a Major League Baseball pitcher, coach, manager, front office executive, and scout. He was sometimes known as "The Junk Man," but better known as "Steady Eddie," a nickname later given to Eddie Murray. He was born in New York, New York.

  25. Sad Sam Jones

    Sad Sam Jones


    Samuel Pond "Sad Sam" Jones (July 26, 1892 – July 6, 1966) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played in the American League with the Cleveland Indians (1914–15), Boston Red Sox (1916–21), New York Yankees (1922–26), St. Louis Browns (1927), Washington Senators (1928–31) and Chicago White Sox (1932–35). A native of Woodsfield, Ohio, Jones batted and threw right-handed. His sharp-breaking curveball also earned him the nickname "Horsewhips Sam".

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