New York Giants (NL) players

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  1. Willie Mays

    Willie Mays


    Willie Howard Mays, Jr. (born May 6, 1931), nicknamed "The Say Hey Kid" is a retired American Major League Baseball (MLB) center fielder who spent almost all of his 22 season career playing for the New York and San Francisco Giants before finishing with the New York Mets. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1979, his first year of eligibility.

  2. Joe Garagiola

    Joe Garagiola


    Joseph Henry "Joe" Garagiola, Sr. (born February 12, 1926) is an American former catcher in Major League Baseball who later became an announcer and television host, popular for his colorful personality. He was well known for being one of the regular panelists of The Today Show for many years.

  3. Casey Stengel

    Casey Stengel


    Charles Dillon "Casey" Stengel (/ˈstɛŋɡəl/; July 30, 1890 – September 29, 1975), nicknamed "The Old Perfessor", was an American Major League Baseball outfielder and manager. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1966.

  4. Billy Milligan

    Billy Milligan


    William Joseph Milligan (August 19, 1878 – October 14, 1928) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher. He played for the Philadelphia Athletics during the 1901 season and the New York Giants during the 1904 season.

  5. Hack Wilson

    Hack Wilson


    Lewis Robert "Hack" Wilson (April 26, 1900 – November 23, 1948) was an American Major League Baseball player who played 12 seasons for the New York Giants, Chicago Cubs, Brooklyn Dodgers and Philadelphia Phillies. Despite his diminutive stature, he was one of the most accomplished power hitters in the game during the late 1920s and early 1930s. His 1930 season with the Cubs is widely considered one of the most memorable individual single-season hitting performances in baseball history. Highlights included 56 home runs, the National League record for 68 years; and 191 runs batted in, a mark yet to be surpassed. "For a brief span of a few years," wrote a sportswriter of the day, "this hammered down little strongman actually rivaled the mighty [Babe] Ruth."

  6. Rogers Hornsby

    Rogers Hornsby


    Rogers Hornsby, Sr. (April 27, 1896 – January 5, 1963), nicknamed "The Rajah", was an American baseball infielder, manager, and coach who played 23 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB). He played for the St. Louis Cardinals (1915–1926, 1933), New York Giants (1927), Boston Braves (1928), Chicago Cubs (1929–1932), and St. Louis Browns (1933–1937). Hornsby had 2,930 hits and 301 home runs in his career; his career .358 batting average is second only to Ty Cobb's average. He was named the National League (NL)'s Most Valuable Player (MVP) twice, and was a member of one World Series championship team.

  7. Mel Ott

    Mel Ott


    Melvin Thomas Ott (March 2, 1909 – November 21, 1958), nicknamed "Master Melvin", was an American former professional baseball player who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a right fielder for the New York Giants, from 1926 through 1947.

  8. Johnny Mize

    Johnny Mize


    John Robert "Johnny" Mize (January 7, 1913 – June 2, 1993), nicknamed Big Jawn and The Big Cat, was a baseball player who was a first baseman for the St. Louis Cardinals, New York Giants, and New York Yankees. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for 15 seasons between 1936 and 1953, losing three seasons to military service during World War II. Mize was a ten-time All-Star. Late in his career, he played with the Yankees when they won five consecutive World Series.

  9. Red Schoendienst

    Red Schoendienst


    Albert Fred "Red" Schoendienst (/ˈʃndnst/; born February 2, 1923) is an American Major League Baseball (MLB) coach, and former player and manager. An outstanding second baseman, he played for 19 years with the St. Louis Cardinals (1945–56, 1961–63), New York Giants (1956–57) and Milwaukee Braves (1957–60), and was named to 10 All Star teams. He then managed the Cardinals from 1965 through 1976, the second-longest managerial tenure in the team's history (behind Tony La Russa). Under his direction, St. Louis won the 1967 and 1968 National League pennants and the 1967 World Series, and he was named National League Manager of the Year in both 1967 and 1968. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1989. Schoendienst remains with the Cardinals as a special assistant coach; as of 2015 he has worn a Major League uniform as a player, coach, or manager for 70 consecutive seasons.

  10. Tony Lazzeri

    Tony Lazzeri


    Anthony Michael "Tony" Lazzeri (December 6, 1903 – August 6, 1946) was an American professional baseball second baseman during the 1920s and 1930s, predominantly with the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball. He was part of the famed "Murderers' Row" Yankee batting lineup of the late 1920s (most notably the legendary 1927 team), along with Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, and Bob Meusel. He was also the first person to hit two grand slams in one game in 1936 vs Athletics.

  11. Jim Thorpe

    Jim Thorpe


    James Francis "Jim" Thorpe (Sac and Fox (Sauk): Wa-Tho-Huk, translated as "Bright Path"; May 22, 1887 – March 28, 1953) was a Sac and Fox athlete of Native American and European ancestry. Considered one of the most versatile athletes of modern sports, he won Olympic gold medals for the 1912 pentathlon and decathlon, played American football (collegiate and professional), and also played professional baseball and basketball. He lost his Olympic titles after it was found he was paid for playing two seasons of semi-professional baseball before competing in the Olympics, thus violating the amateurism rules that were then in place. In 1983, 30 years after his death, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) restored his Olympic medals.

  12. Ernie Lombardi

    Ernie Lombardi


    Ernesto Natali "Ernie" Lombardi (April 6, 1908 – September 26, 1977), was an American former professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a catcher for the Brooklyn Robins, the Cincinnati Reds, the Boston Braves, and the New York Giants during a career that spanned 17 years, from 1931 through 1947. He had several nicknames, including "Schnozz", "Lumbago", "Bocci", "The Cyrano of the Iron Mask" and "Lom". He was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1986.

  13. Al Dark

    Al Dark


    Alvin Ralph "Al" Dark (January 7, 1922 – November 13, 2014), nicknamed "Blackie" and "The Swamp Fox", was an American Major League Baseball (MLB) shortstop and manager. He played fourteen years for five National League teams from 1946 through 1960. Dark was named the major leagues' 1948 Rookie of the Year after batting .322 for the Boston Braves.

  14. Joe Medwick

    Joe Medwick


    Joseph Michael Medwick (November 24, 1911 – March 21, 1975), nicknamed "Ducky", was an American Major League Baseball player. A left fielder for the St. Louis Cardinals during the "Gashouse Gang" era of the 1930s, he also played for the Brooklyn Dodgers (1940–1943, 1946), New York Giants (1943–1945), and Boston Braves (1945). In 1937, Medwick won the National League Triple Crown.

  15. Bobo Newsom

    Bobo Newsom


    Louis Norman (Bobo) Newsom (August 11, 1907 – December 7, 1962) was an American starting pitcher in Major League Baseball. Also known as "Buck", Newsom played for a number of teams from 1929 through 1953. He batted and threw right-handed.

  16. Andy Cohen

    Andy Cohen


    Andrew Howard Cohen, the "Tuscaloosa Terror", (October 25, 1904 – October 29, 1988) was a second baseman in Major League Baseball. He played from 1926–29 for the New York Giants.

  17. Rube Marquard

    Rube Marquard


    Richard William "Rube" Marquard (October 9, 1886 – June 1, 1980) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball in the 1910s and early 1920s. He achieved his greatest success with the New York Giants. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1971.

  18. Sal Maglie

    Sal Maglie


    Salvatore Anthony Maglie (April 26, 1917 – December 28, 1992) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher. He played from 1945 to 1958 for the New York Giants, Cleveland Indians, Brooklyn Dodgers, New York Yankees, and St. Louis Cardinals. Maglie was known as "Sal the Barber", because he gave close shaves—that is, pitched inside to hitters. Coincidentally, he also sported a five o'clock shadow look. He also had the distinction of being one of the few players, and only pitcher, to play for all three New York City baseball teams. During a 10-year major league baseball career, Maglie compiled 119 wins, 862 strikeouts, and an 3.15 earned run average.

  19. Dan Brouthers

    Dan Brouthers


    Dennis Joseph "Dan" Brouthers (ˈbrθərz; May 8, 1858 – August 2, 1932) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball whose career spanned the period from 1879 to 1896, with a brief return in 1904. Nicknamed "Big Dan" for his size, he was 6 feet 2 inches (1.88 m) and weighed 207 pounds (94 kg), which was large for 19th-century standards.

  20. Jake Beckley

    Jake Beckley


    Jacob Peter Beckley (August 4, 1867 – June 25, 1918), nicknamed "Eagle Eye", was a Major League Baseball player at the turn of the 20th century. He played for several major league teams between 1888 and 1907. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee in 1971.

  21. Joey Amalfitano

    Joey Amalfitano


    John Joseph Amalfitano (born January 23, 1934) is a former utility infielder, manager and coach in Major League Baseball (MLB). He played a combined ten seasons with the New York/San Francisco Giants (1954–1955, 1960–1961, 1963), Houston Colt .45s (1962) and Chicago Cubs (1964–1967), and managed the Cubs from 19791981. Amalfitano is perhaps best known as the Los Angeles Dodgers' third-base coach for sixteen years from 1983 to 1998, which included a World Series championship. He is currently a special assistant for player development for the San Francisco Giants, primarily working in its farm system.

  22. Gabby Hartnett

    Gabby Hartnett


    Charles Leo "Gabby" Hartnett (December 20, 1900 – December 20, 1972) was an American professional baseball player and manager. He played almost his entire career in Major League Baseball as a catcher for the Chicago Cubs from 1922 to 1940. He spent the final season of his career as a player-coach for the New York Giants in 1941. After his playing career, he continued his involvement in baseball as a coach and as a minor league manager.

  23. Ethan Allen

    Ethan Allen


    Ethan Nathan Allen (January 1, 1904 – September 15, 1993) was an American center fielder in Major League Baseball from 1926 to 1938. He played for the Cincinnati Reds (1926–30), New York Giants (1930–32), St. Louis Cardinals (1932–33), Philadelphia Phillies (1934–36), Chicago Cubs (1936), and St. Louis Browns (1936–38).

  24. Hoyt Wilhelm

    Hoyt Wilhelm


    James Hoyt Wilhelm (July 26, 1922 – August 23, 2002), nicknamed "Old Sarge", was an American Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher with the New York Giants, St. Louis Cardinals, Cleveland Indians, Baltimore Orioles, Chicago White Sox, California Angels, Atlanta Braves, Chicago Cubs, and Los Angeles Dodgers between 1952 and 1972. He is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame.

  25. Jack Taylor

    Jack Taylor


    John Besson "Brewery Jack" Taylor (May 23, 1873 – February 7, 1900) was a baseball player in the National League from 1891 to 1899. He is often confused with John W. "Jack" Taylor, who also played in the NL during an overlapping period. His real name has also been erroneously published as John Budd Taylor in many sources, perhaps confused with the Minor League pitcher Jack "Bud" Taylor of similar period. John Besson Taylor was born in Sandy Hill, Maryland and moved to Staten Island, New York as a young child, where he played with future Major League contemporaries Jack Cronin, Jack Sharrott, George Sharrott, and Tuck Turner.

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