National League All-Stars

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  1. Matt Kemp

    Matt Kemp


    Matthew Ryan "Matt" Kemp (born September 23, 1984) is an American professional baseball outfielder for the San Diego Padres of Major League Baseball (MLB). He has been named to two All-Star teams and has won two Gold Glove Awards (2009 and 2011) and two Silver Slugger Awards (2009 and 2011). He began his professional career in the Los Angeles Dodgers organization in 2003, and played with the Dodgers from 2006 until 2014.

  2. Brad Penny

    Brad Penny


    Bradley Wayne Penny (born May 24, 1978) is an American professional baseball pitcher in the Chicago White Sox organization. Penny has played in MLB with the Miami Marlins, Los Angeles Dodgers, Boston Red Sox, San Francisco Giants, St. Louis Cardinals, and Detroit Tigers, and in Nippon Professional Baseball for the Fukuoka SoftBank Hawks. Penny is a two-time MLB All Star.

  3. David Wright

    David Wright


    David Allen Wright (born December 20, 1982) is an American professional baseball third baseman who serves as captain for the New York Mets of Major League Baseball (MLB). He was drafted by the Mets in 2001 and made his major league debut in 2004.

  4. David Justice

    David Justice


    David Christopher Justice (born April 14, 1966) is a former American outfielder and designated hitter in Major League Baseball who played for the Atlanta Braves (1989–1996), Cleveland Indians (1997–2000), New York Yankees (2000–2001), and Oakland Athletics (2002).

  5. Keith Hernandez

    Keith Hernandez


    Keith Hernandez (born October 20, 1953) is a former Major League Baseball first baseman who played the majority of his career with the St. Louis Cardinals and New York Mets. Hernandez was a five-time All -Star who shared the 1979 NL MVP award, and won two World Series titles, one each with the Cardinals and Mets.

  6. Chipper Jones

    Chipper Jones


    Larry Wayne "Chipper" Jones, Jr. (born April 24, 1972) is an American former Major League Baseball (MLB) third baseman who spent his entire 19-year MLB career playing for the Atlanta Braves, and all 23 years as a professional baseball player in the Atlanta organization. Initially a shortstop, he was the Braves' primary starting third baseman for nearly all of the period from 1995–2012. In 2002 and 2003, Jones played left field before returning to third base in 2004. Standing 6' 4" (76 inches (190 cm)) tall and weighing 210 pounds (95 kg) during his playing career, Jones threw right-handed and was a switch hitter.

  7. Barry Bonds

    Barry Bonds


    Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964) is an American former professional baseball left fielder who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) with the Pittsburgh Pirates and San Francisco Giants. Bonds received seven NL MVP awards and 14 All-Star selections, and is considered to be one of the greatest baseball players of all time.

  8. Bronson Arroyo

    Bronson Arroyo


    Bronson Anthony Arroyo (born February 24, 1977) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball. He has previously played for the Pittsburgh Pirates between 2000 and 2002, the Boston Red Sox from 2003 to 2005, the Cincinnati Reds from 2006 to 2013, the Arizona Diamondbacks from 2014 to 2015.

  9. Johnny Bench

    Johnny Bench


    Johnny Lee Bench (born December 7, 1947 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) is a former professional baseball catcher who played in the Major Leagues for the Cincinnati Reds from 1967 to 1983 and is a member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Bench, a 14-time All-Star selection and a two-time National League Most Valuable Player, was a key member of The Big Red Machine, which won six division titles, four National League pennants, and two World Series championships. ESPN has called him the greatest catcher in baseball history.

  10. Mark Grace

    Mark Grace


    Mark Eugene Grace (born June 28, 1964) is a former Major League Baseball first baseman for 16 seasons with the Chicago Cubs and Arizona Diamondbacks. He is currently a coach with the Diamondbacks after spending 2014 as hitting coach for the Hillsboro Hops of the Northwest League. He batted left-handed. He wore jersey number 28 and 17 during his rookie season in 1988, and he kept number 17 for the remaining of his career. Grace retired with a .303 batting average and a .383 career on-base percentage, the 148th best in major league history.

  11. Carl Pavano

    Carl Pavano


    Carl Anthony Pavano (born January 8, 1976) is an American former professional baseball player. A right-handed pitcher, Pavano played in Major League Baseball from 1998 to 2012 for the Montreal Expos, Florida Marlins, New York Yankees, Cleveland Indians, and Minnesota Twins. He was a member of the 2003 World Series champions and appeared in the 2004 Major League Baseball All-Star Game.

  12. Hunter Pence

    Hunter Pence


    Hunter Andrew Pence (born April 13, 1983) is a Major League Baseball right fielder for the San Francisco Giants. He previously played for the Houston Astros and Philadelphia Phillies. Pence stands 6 feet 4 inches (193 cm) tall and weighs 220 pounds (100 kg). He bats and throws right-handed. He was a member of the 2012 World Series and 2014 World Series championship teams with the San Francisco Giants.

  13. Roger Clemens

    Roger Clemens


    William Roger Clemens (born August 4, 1962), nicknamed "Rocket", is a retired American baseball pitcher who played 24 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for four teams. Clemens was one of the most dominant pitchers in major league history, tallying 354 wins, a 3.12 earned run average (ERA), and 4,672 strikeouts, the third-most all time. An 11-time All-Star and two-time World Series champion, he won seven Cy Young Awards during his career, the most of any pitcher in history. Clemens was known for his fierce competitive nature and hard-throwing pitching style, which he used to intimidate batters.

  14. Sammy Sosa

    Sammy Sosa


    Samuel Kelvin "Sammy" Peralta Sosa (born November 12, 1968) is a Dominican retired professional baseball right fielder. Sosa played with four Major League Baseball teams over his career, which spanned from 1989 to 2007. Sosa's Major League career began with the Texas Rangers in 1989. After three seasons with the Chicago White Sox, Sosa became a member of the Chicago Cubs in 1992 and became one of the league's best hitters. Sosa hit his 400th home runs in his 1,354th game and his 5,273rd at-bat, the quickest in National League history. In 1998, Sosa and Mark McGwire achieved national fame for their home run-hitting prowess in pursuit of Roger Maris' home run record.

  15. Marco Scutaro

    Marco Scutaro


    Marcos Scutaro, better known as Marco Scutaro, (/ˈsktər/; born October 30, 1975) is a Venezuelan former professional baseball infielder for the San Francisco Giants of Major League Baseball (MLB). He bats and throws right-handed. Scutaro made his MLB debut with the New York Mets in 2002. Since then, he has also played for the Oakland Athletics, Toronto Blue Jays, Boston Red Sox, Colorado Rockies and San Francisco Giants. Scutaro was named the most valuable player of the 2012 National League Championship Series while with the Giants.

  16. Sandy Koufax

    Sandy Koufax


    Sanford "Sandy" Koufax (ˈkfæks; born Sanford Braun; December 30, 1935) is a retired American Major League Baseball (MLB) left-handed pitcher. He pitched twelve seasons for the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers, from 1955 to 1966. Koufax, at age 36 in 1972, became the youngest player ever inducted in the Baseball Hall of Fame.

  17. Ryan Klesko

    Ryan Klesko


    Ryan Anthony Klesko (born June 12, 1971 in Westminster, California), is a former Major League Baseball first baseman and corner outfielder, who played for the Atlanta Braves, San Diego Padres, and the San Francisco Giants. He attended Westminster High School in Westminster, California.

  18. Ralph Kiner

    Ralph Kiner


    Ralph McPherran Kiner (October 27, 1922 – February 6, 2014) was an American Major League Baseball player. An outfielder, Kiner played for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Chicago Cubs, and Cleveland Indians from 1946 through 1955. He also served as an announcer for the New York Mets from the team's inception until his death. Though injuries forced his retirement from active play after 10 seasons, Kiner's tremendous slugging outpaced all of his National League contemporaries between the years 1946 and 1952. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1975.

  19. Mark McGwire

    Mark McGwire


    Mark David McGwire (born October 1, 1963), nicknamed "Big Mac", is an American former professional baseball player currently serving as the hitting coach for the Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball (MLB). As a first baseman, his MLB career spanned from 1986 to 2001 while playing for the Oakland Athletics and the St. Louis Cardinals. He quickly grabbed media attention in 1987 as a rookie with the Athletics by hitting 33 home runs before the All-Star break, and would lead the major leagues in home runs that year with 49, setting the single-season rookie record. He appeared in six straight All-Star Games from 1987 to 1992 despite a brief career decline related to injuries. Another string of six consecutive All-Star appearances followed from 1995 to 2001. Each season from 1996 to 1999, he again led the major leagues in home runs.

  20. Jackie Robinson

    Jackie Robinson


    Jack Roosevelt "Jackie" Robinson (January 31, 1919 – October 24, 1972) was an American Major League Baseball (MLB) second baseman who became the first African American to play in the major leagues in the modern era. Robinson broke the baseball color line when the Brooklyn Dodgers started him at first base on April 15, 1947. The Dodgers, by playing Robinson, ended racial segregation that had relegated black players to the Negro leagues since the 1880s. Robinson was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1962.

  21. Pete Rose

    Pete Rose


    Peter Edward "Pete" Rose, Sr. (born April 14, 1941), also known by his nickname "Charlie Hustle", is a former Major League Baseball player and manager. Rose played from 1963 to 1986, and managed from 1984 to 1989.

  22. Ryan Howard

    Ryan Howard


    {{Infobox MLB player | name = Ryan Howard | image = Ryan Howard (18689970748).jpg | image_size = 240px | caption = Howard with the Philadelphia Phillies | position = First baseman | team = Philadelphia Phillies | number = 6 | bats = Left | throws = Left | birth_date = (1979-11-19) November 19, 1979 (age 35) | birth_place = St. Louis, Missouri | debutdate = September 2 | debutyear = 2004 | debutteam = Philadelphia Phillies| | statyear = August 25, 2015 | stat1label = Batting average | stat1value = .263 | stat2label = Hits | stat2value = 1,402 | stat3label = Home runs | stat3value = 355 | stat4label = Runs batted in | stat4value = 1,130 | teams =

  23. Jake Peavy

    Jake Peavy


    Jacob Edward "Jake" Peavy (born May 31, 1981) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the San Francisco Giants of Major League Baseball (MLB). He has also played in MLB for the San Diego Padres, Chicago White Sox and Boston Red Sox. He bats and throws right-handed.

  24. Ken Griffey Jr.

    Ken Griffey Jr.


    George Kenneth "Ken" Griffey, Jr. (born November 21, 1969), nicknamed "Junior" and "The Kid", is an American former professional baseball outfielder who played 22 years in Major League Baseball (MLB) for three teams (1989–2010). He spent most of his career with the Seattle Mariners and Cincinnati Reds, along with a short stint with the Chicago White Sox. A 13-time All-Star, Griffey was one of the most prolific home run hitters in baseball history; his 630 home runs rank as the sixth-most in MLB history. Griffey was also an exceptional defender and won 10 Gold Glove Awards in center field. He is tied for the record of most consecutive games with a home run (8 games, tied with Don Mattingly and Dale Long).

  25. Randy Johnson

    Randy Johnson


    Randall David "Randy" Johnson (born September 10, 1963), nicknamed "The Big Unit", is an American former left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played from 1988 to 2009 for six teams, primarily the Seattle Mariners and Arizona Diamondbacks. His 303 career victories rank as the fifth-most by a lefthander in major league history, while his 4,875 strikeouts place him second all-time behind Nolan Ryan and are the most by a lefthander. He holds five of the seven highest single-season strikeout totals by a lefthander in modern history. Johnson won the Cy Young Award five times, second only to Roger Clemens' seven; he is one of two pitchers to win the award four consecutive times (1999-2002), and in 1999 – along with Pedro Martínez – joined Gaylord Perry in the rare feat of winning the award in both the American and National Leagues. He is also one of five pitchers to hurl no-hitters in both leagues; with the second no-hitter, in 2004, he became the oldest pitcher in major league history to throw a perfect game. He is one of the few pitchers in history to record a win against all 30 MLB franchises.

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