Major League Baseball pitchers who have won the Triple Crown

Posted May 2, 2011
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  1. Justin Verlander
    #1

    Justin Verlander

    30,325 views

    Justin Brooks Verlander (born February 20, 1983) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Detroit Tigers of Major League Baseball (MLB).


  2. Roger Clemens
    #2

    Roger Clemens

    6,942 views

    William Roger Clemens (born August 4, 1962), nicknamed "Rocket", is a retired American baseball pitcher who played 24 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for four teams. Clemens was one of the most dominant pitchers in major league history, tallying 354 wins, a 3.12 earned run average (ERA), and 4,672 strikeouts, the third-most all time. An 11-time All-Star and two-time World Series champion, he won seven Cy Young Awards during his career, the most of any pitcher in history. Clemens was known for his fierce competitive nature and hard-throwing pitching style, which he used to intimidate batters.


  3. Sandy Koufax
    #3

    Sandy Koufax

    6,353 views

    Sanford "Sandy" Koufax (/ˈkfæks/; born Sanford Braun; December 30, 1935) is a retired American Major League Baseball (MLB) left-handed pitcher. He pitched twelve seasons for the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers, from 1955 to 1966. Koufax, at age 36 in 1972, became the youngest player ever inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.


  4. Jake Peavy
    #4

    Jake Peavy

    4,123 views

    Jacob Edward "Jake" Peavy (born May 31, 1981) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the San Francisco Giants of Major League Baseball (MLB). He has also played in MLB for the San Diego Padres, Chicago White Sox and Boston Red Sox. He bats and throws right-handed.


  5. Randy Johnson
    #5

    Randy Johnson

    6,924 views

    Randall David "Randy" Johnson (born September 10, 1963), nicknamed "The Big Unit", is an American former left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played from 1988 to 2009 for six teams, primarily the Seattle Mariners and Arizona Diamondbacks. His 303 career victories rank as the fifth-most by a lefthander in major league history, while his 4,875 strikeouts place him second all-time behind Nolan Ryan and are the most by a lefthander. He holds five of the seven highest single-season strikeout totals by a lefthander in modern history. Johnson won the Cy Young Award five times, second only to Roger Clemens' seven; he is one of two pitchers to win the award four consecutive times (1999-2002), and in 1999 – along with Pedro Martínez – joined Gaylord Perry in the rare feat of winning the award in both the American and National Leagues. He is also one of five pitchers to hurl no-hitters in both leagues; with the second no-hitter, in 2004, he became the oldest pitcher in major league history to throw a perfect game. He is one of the few pitchers in history to record a win against all 30 MLB franchises.


  6. Pedro Martinez
    #6

    Pedro Martinez

    1,678 views

    Pedro Jaime Martínez (born October 25, 1971) is a Dominican-American former starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for five teams from 1992 to 2009, most notably the Boston Red Sox. From 2002 to 2006 he held the major league record for the highest career winning percentage by a pitcher with at least 200 decisions; with a final record of 219 wins and 100 losses, he retired with the fourth highest percentage in history, and the highest by a right-hander since the modern pitching era began in 1893. He ended his career with an earned run average (ERA) of 2.93, the sixth lowest by a pitcher with at least 2,500 innings pitched since 1920. Martínez reached the 3,000 strikeout mark in fewer innings than any pitcher except Randy Johnson, and is the only pitcher to compile over 3,000 strikeouts with less than 3,000 innings pitched; his career strikeout rate of 10.04 per 9 innings trails only Johnson (10.61) among pitchers with over 1,500 innings.


  7. Dwight Gooden
    #7

    Dwight Gooden

    918 views

    Dwight Eugene "Doc" Gooden (born November 16, 1964), nicknamed "Dr. K", is an American retired professional baseball player. A pitcher, Gooden played in Major League Baseball for the New York Mets, New York Yankees, Cleveland Indians, Houston Astros, and Tampa Bay Devil Rays from 1984 through 2000.


  8. Clayton Kershaw
    #8

    Clayton Kershaw

    779 views

    Clayton Edward Kershaw (born March 19, 1988) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball (MLB). A left-handed starting pitcher, Kershaw has played in the major leagues since 2008, and his career earned run average (ERA) is the lowest among starters in the live-ball era with a minimum of 1,000 innings pitched. He is also a three-time Cy Young Award winner and the 2014 National League Most Valuable Player.


  9. Cy Young
    #9

    Cy Young

    513 views

    Denton True "Cy" Young (March 29, 1867 – November 4, 1955) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher. During his 21-year baseball career (1890–1911), he pitched for five different teams. Young established numerous pitching records, some of which have stood for a century. Young compiled 511 wins, which is most in Major League history and 94 ahead of Walter Johnson who is second on the list. Young was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1937.


  10. Bob Feller
    #10

    Bob Feller

    446 views

    Robert William Andrew Feller (November 3, 1918 – December 15, 2010), nicknamed "The Heater from Van Meter", "Bullet Bob", and "Rapid Robert", was an American baseball pitcher who played 18 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Cleveland Indians. Feller pitched from 1936 to 1941 and from 1945 to 1956, interrupted only by a four-year sojourn in the Navy. In a career spanning 570 games, Feller pitched 3,827 innings and posted a win–loss record of 266–162, with 279 complete games, 44 shutouts, and a 3.25 earned run average (ERA).


  11. Johan Santana
    #11

    Johan Santana

    293 views

    Johan Alexander Santana Araque (/ˈjhɑːn sænˈtænə/; born March 13, 1979) is a Venezuelan professional baseball starting pitcher who is a free agent. Santana pitched in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Minnesota Twins from 2000 to 2007 and for the New York Mets from 2008 to 2012, sidelined by injury challenges since the 2012 season. A two-time Cy Young Award winner with the Twins, Santana is a four-time All-Star and earned a pitching triple crown in 2006. On June 1, 2012, Santana threw a no-hitter against the St. Louis Cardinals, the first no-hitter in New York Mets then 51 year franchise history.


  12. Steve Carlton
    #12

    Steve Carlton

    267 views

    Steven Norman "Steve" Carlton (born December 22, 1944), nicknamed "Lefty", is a former Major League Baseball left-handed pitcher. He pitched from 1965 to 1988 for six different teams in his career, but it is his time with the Philadelphia Phillies where he received his greatest acclaim as a professional and won four Cy Young Awards. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1994.


  13. Walter Johnson
    #13

    Walter Johnson

    250 views

    Walter Perry Johnson (November 6, 1887 – December 10, 1946), nicknamed "Barney" and "The Big Train", was a Major League Baseball right-handed pitcher. He played his entire 21-year baseball career for the Washington Senators (1907–1927). He later served as manager of the Senators from 1929 through 1932 and for the Cleveland Indians from 1933 through 1935.


  14. Lefty Gomez
    #14

    Lefty Gomez

    158 views

    Vernon Louis "Lefty" Gomez (November 26, 1908 – February 17, 1989) was an American professional baseball player. A left-handed pitcher, Gomez played in Major League Baseball (MLB) between 1930 and 1943 for the New York Yankees and the Washington Senators. Gomez was a five-time World Series champion with the Yankees. He was also known for his colorful personality and humor throughout his career and life.


  15. Dazzy Vance
    #15

    Dazzy Vance

    144 views

    Charles Arthur "Dazzy" Vance (March 4, 1891 – February 16, 1961) was an American professional baseball player. He played as a pitcher for five different franchises in Major League Baseball (MLB) in a career that spanned twenty years. Known for his impressive fastball, Vance was the only pitcher to lead the National League in strikeouts seven consecutive seasons. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1955.


  16. Bucky Walters
    #16

    Bucky Walters

    102 views

    William Henry "Bucky" Walters (April 19, 1909 – April 20, 1991) was an American Major League Baseball All-Star pitcher. A native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Walters played for the Boston Braves (1931–32, 1950), Boston Red Sox (1933–1934), Philadelphia Phillies (1934–1938) and Cincinnati Reds (1938–1948). He batted and threw right-handed.


  17. Rube Waddell
    #17

    Rube Waddell

    103 views

    George Edward (Rube) Waddell (October 13, 1876 – April 1, 1914) was an American southpaw pitcher in Major League Baseball (MLB). In his thirteen-year career he played for the Louisville Colonels (1897, 1899), Pittsburgh Pirates (1900–01) and Chicago Orphans (1901) in the National League, and the Philadelphia Athletics (1902–07) and St. Louis Browns (1908–10) in the American League. Born in Bradford, Pennsylvania, Waddell was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1946.


  18. Christy Mathewson
    #18

    Christy Mathewson

    135 views

    Christopher "Christy" Mathewson (August 12, 1880 – October 7, 1925), nicknamed "Big Six", "The Christian Gentleman", "Matty", or "The Gentleman's Hurler" was a Major League Baseball right-handed pitcher who played 17 seasons with the New York Giants. He was among the most dominant pitchers of his (or any) era and ranks in the all-time top-10 in major pitching categories including wins, shutouts, and ERA. In fact, he is the only pitcher in MLB history to rank in the top ten both in career wins and in career ERA. In 1936, Mathewson was posthumously elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame as one of its "first five" inaugural members.


  19. Grover Cleveland Alexander
    #19

    Grover Cleveland Alexander

    78 views

    Grover Cleveland Alexander (February 26, 1887 – November 4, 1950), nicknamed "Old Pete", was an American Major League Baseball pitcher. He played from 1911 through 1930 for the Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago Cubs, and St. Louis Cardinals. He was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1938. He was portrayed by future President Ronald Reagan in a 1952 biographical film, The Winning Team.


  20. Hal Newhouser
    #20

    Hal Newhouser

    82 views

    Harold "Prince Hal" Newhouser (May 20, 1921 – November 10, 1998) was an American former professional baseball player. In Major League Baseball (MLB), he pitched 17 seasons on the Detroit Tigers and Cleveland Indians, from 1939 through 1955. Newhouser was an All-Star for six seasons, and was considered to be the most dominating pitcher of the World War II era of baseball, winning a pitcher's triple crown for the Tigers in 1945.


  21. Amos Rusie
    #21

    Amos Rusie

    64 views

    Amos Wilson Rusie (May 30, 1871 – December 6, 1942), nicknamed "The Hoosier Thunderbolt", was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball during the late 19th century. He had a 10-season career in the National League (NL), which consisted of one season with the Indianapolis Hoosiers in 1889, eight with the New York Giants from 1890 to 1898, and one with the Cincinnati Reds in 1901.


  22. Lefty Grove
    #22

    Lefty Grove

    55 views

    Robert Moses "Lefty" Grove (March 6, 1900 – May 22, 1975) was a professional baseball pitcher. After having success in the minor leagues during the early 1920s, Grove became a star in Major League Baseball with the American League's Philadelphia Athletics and Boston Red Sox, winning 300 games in his 17-year MLB career. He was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1947.


  23. Tommy Bond
    #23

    Tommy Bond

    44 views

    Thomas Henry Bond (April 2, 1856 – January 24, 1941) was a Major League Baseball player who was a pitcher and a right fielder a total of ten seasons. A native of Granard, Ireland, he is the first man born in Ireland to play Major League Baseball. Bond was also the last survivor of the National League's first season (1876). Bond played for six teams during his career: the Brooklyn Atlantics (1874), Hartford Dark Blues (1875–76), Boston Red Caps (1877–81), Worcester Ruby Legs (1882), Boston Reds (1884), and Indianapolis Hoosiers (1884). He also managed the Worcester team for six games.


  24. John Clarkson
    #24

    John Clarkson

    23 views

    John Gibson Clarkson (July 1, 1861 – February 4, 1909) was a Major League Baseball right-handed pitcher. He played from 1882 to 1894. Born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Clarkson played for the Worcester Ruby Legs (1882), Chicago White Stockings (1884–1887), Boston Beaneaters (1888–1892), and Cleveland Spiders (1892–1894).


  25. Old Hoss Radbourn
    #25

    Old Hoss Radbourn

    20 views

    Charles Gardner Radbourn (December 11, 1854 – February 5, 1897), nicknamed "Old Hoss", was an American professional baseball pitcher who played 12 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB). He played for the Buffalo Bisons (1880), Providence Grays (1881–1885), Boston Beaneaters (1886–1889), Boston Reds (1890), and Cincinnati Reds (1891). In 1884, Radbourn became the second National League (NL) pitcher to win a Triple Crown; in the process, he broke the single-season wins record, which still stands today. Radbourn was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1939.


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