Major League Baseball on NBC

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  1. Hannah Storm

    Hannah Storm


    Hannah Storm (born Hannah Lynn Storen June 13, 1962) is an American television sports journalist, serving as co-anchor of ESPN's SportsCenter Sunday morning with Bob Ley, and Monday-Thursday mornings with Kevin Negandhi. She was also host of the NBA Countdown pregame show on ABC as part of the network's NBA Sunday game coverage.

  2. Keith Olbermann

    Keith Olbermann


    Keith Theodore Olbermann (/ˈlbərmən/; born January 27, 1959) is an American sports and political commentator and writer. Recently, he hosted a later afternoon show on ESPN2 and TSN2 called Olbermann, from July 2013 until July 2015 as well as being the studio host of TBS's Major League Baseball postseason coverage.

  3. Ahmad Rashad

    Ahmad Rashad


    Ahmad Rashād (born Robert Earl Moore on November 19, 1949) is an American sportscaster (mostly with NBC Sports) and former professional football player. He was the fourth overall selection of the 1972 NFL Draft, taken by the St. Louis Cardinals.

  4. Bob Costas

    Bob Costas


    Robert Quinlan "Bob" Costas (born March 22, 1952) is an American sportscaster, on the air for NBC Sports television since the early 1980s. He has been prime-time host of nine Olympic games. He also does play-by-play for MLB Network and hosts an interview show called Studio 42 with Bob Costas.

  5. Johnny Bench

    Johnny Bench


    Johnny Lee Bench (born December 7, 1947 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) is a former professional baseball catcher who played in the Major Leagues for the Cincinnati Reds from 1967 to 1983 and is a member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Bench, a 14-time All-Star selection and a two-time National League Most Valuable Player, was a key member of The Big Red Machine, which won six division titles, four National League pennants, and two World Series championships. ESPN has called him the greatest catcher in baseball history.

  6. Mickey Mantle

    Mickey Mantle


    Mickey Charles Mantle (October 20, 1931 - August 13, 1995), nicknamed "The Commerce Comet" or "The Mick", was an American baseball player who played center field and first base for the New York Yankees, from 1951 through 1968. Mantle is regarded by many to be the greatest switch hitter of all time, and one of the best players and sluggers in baseball history. He was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974 and was elected to the Major League Baseball All-Century Team in 1999.

  7. Sandy Koufax

    Sandy Koufax


    Sanford "Sandy" Koufax (ˈkfæks; born Sanford Braun; December 30, 1935) is a retired American Major League Baseball (MLB) left-handed pitcher. He pitched twelve seasons for the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers, from 1955 to 1966. Koufax, at age 36 in 1972, became the youngest player ever inducted in the Baseball Hall of Fame.

  8. Bill Macatee

    Bill Macatee


    Bill Macatee (born November 17, 1955) is an American sports broadcaster for CBS Sports and the Tennis Channel.

  9. Bob Uecker

    Bob Uecker


    Robert George "Bob" Uecker (ˈjuːkər EWK-ər; born January 26, 1934) is a retired American Major League Baseball player, later a sportscaster, comedian and actor. Uecker was given the title of "Mr. Baseball" by TV talk show host Johnny Carson. Since 1971 Uecker has served as a play-by-play announcer for Milwaukee Brewers radio broadcasts.

  10. One Moment In Time

    One Moment In Time (1988)


    "One Moment in Time" is a worldwide hit Emmy Award winning song written by Albert Hammond and John Bettis, produced by Narada Michael Walden and recorded by American singer Whitney Houston for the 1988 Summer Olympics and the 1988 Summer Paralympics held in Seoul, South Korea. The song was Houston's third number one in the UK Singles Chart, and reached number five on the US Billboard Hot 100.

  11. Bill Buckner

    Bill Buckner


    William Joseph "Bill" Buckner (born December 14, 1949) is a former Major League Baseball (MLB) first baseman. He appeared in MLB from 1969 through 1990. During his career, he played for the Los Angeles Dodgers, Chicago Cubs, Boston Red Sox, California Angels, and Kansas City Royals.

  12. Gayle Gardner

    Gayle Gardner


    Gayle Gardner (born ca. 1950) is an American sportscaster who worked for ESPN and NBC Sports beginning in 1987 until 1993. Gardner is considered a pioneer in sports broadcasting, having been the first female sports anchor to appear weekly on a major network.

  13. Bryant Gumbel

    Bryant Gumbel


    Bryant Charles Gumbel (born September 29, 1948) is an American television journalist and sportscaster. He is best known for his 15 years as co-host of NBC's The Today Show. He is the younger brother of sportscaster Greg Gumbel.

  14. Leo Durocher

    Leo Durocher


    Leo Ernest Durocher (July 27, 1905 – October 7, 1991), nicknamed Leo the Lip, was an American professional baseball player and manager. He played in Major League Baseball as an infielder. Upon his retirement, he ranked fifth all-time among managers with 2,009 career victories, second only to John McGraw in National League history. Durocher still ranks tenth in career wins by a manager. A controversial and outspoken character, Durocher had a stormy career dogged by clashes with authority, umpires (his 95 career ejections as a manager trailed only McGraw when he retired, and still rank fourth on the all-time list), and the press.

  15. Hank Aaron

    Hank Aaron


    Henry Louis "Hank" Aaron (born February 5, 1934), nicknamed "Hammer", or "Hammerin' Hank", is a retired American Major League Baseball (MLB) right fielder. He played 21 seasons for the Milwaukee/Atlanta Braves in the National League (NL) and 2 seasons for the Milwaukee Brewers in the American League (AL), from 1954 through 1976. Aaron held the MLB record for career home runs for 33 years, and he still holds several MLB offensive records. He hit 24 or more home runs every year from 1955 through 1973, and is the only player to hit 30 or more home runs in a season at least fifteen times. In 1999, The Sporting News ranked Aaron fifth on their "100 Greatest Baseball Players" list.

  16. Maury Wills

    Maury Wills


    Maurice Morning "Maury" Wills (born October 2, 1932) is a former American Major League Baseball (MLB) shortstop and switch-hitter. He played for the Los Angeles Dodgers from 1959 to 1966 and in 1969–72, Pittsburgh Pirates from 1967 to 1968, and Montreal Expos in 1969. Wills was an essential component of the Dodgers' championship teams in the mid-1960s, and is credited for reviving the stolen base as part of baseball strategy.

  17. Joe Torre

    Joe Torre


    Joseph Paul "Joe" Torre (/ˈtɔri/; born July 18, 1940) is an American professional baseball executive, serving in the capacity of Major League Baseball's (MLB) chief baseball officer since 2011. A former player, manager and television color commentator, Torre ranks fifth all-time in MLB history with 2,326 wins as a manager. With 2,342 hits during his playing career, Torre is the only major leaguer to achieve both 2,000 hits and 2,000 wins as a manager. From 1996 to 2007, he was the manager of the New York Yankees, whom he guided to four World Series championships.

  18. Vin Scully

    Vin Scully


    Vincent Edward "Vin" Scully (born November 29, 1927) is an American sportscaster, best known as the play-by-play announcer for the Los Angeles Dodgers MLB team. He has been with the team since its days in Brooklyn. His 66 seasons with the Dodgers (1950–present) are the longest time any broadcaster has been with a single team in professional sports history, and he is second by one year to only Tommy Lasorda in terms of number of years with the Dodgers organization in any capacity.

  19. Greg Gumbel

    Greg Gumbel


    Greg Gumbel (born May 3, 1946) is an American television sportscaster. He is best known for his various assignments on the CBS network (most notably, the National Football League and NCAA basketball). The older brother of news and sportscaster Bryant Gumbel, he became the first African-American (and Creole) announcer to call play-by-play of a major sports championship in the United States when he announced Super Bowl XXXV for the CBS network in 2001. He is of Creole ancestry. Gumbel is currently the host of Inside the NFL (since 2014) on Showtime and NFL Network. He works alongside Boomer Esiason, Phil Simms, Ed Reed and Brandon Marshall on the program.

  20. Marv Albert

    Marv Albert


    Marv Albert (born Marvin Philip Aufrichtig; June 12, 1941) is an American sportscaster. Honored for his work as a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame, he is commonly referred to as "the voice of basketball". From 19672004, he was also known as "the voice of the New York Knicks".

  21. Joe Morgan

    Joe Morgan


    Joe Leonard Morgan (born September 19, 1943) is a former Major League Baseball second baseman who played for the Houston Astros, Cincinnati Reds, San Francisco Giants, Philadelphia Phillies, and Oakland Athletics from 1963 to 1984. He won two World Series championships with the Reds in 1975 and 1976 and was also named the National League Most Valuable Player in those years. Considered one of the greatest second basemen of all-time, Morgan was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1990. He became a baseball broadcaster for ESPN after his retirement, and now hosts a weekly nationally syndicated radio show for Sports USA. He is currently a special adviser to the Reds.

  22. Don Drysdale

    Don Drysdale


    Donald Scott "Don" Drysdale (July 23, 1936 – July 3, 1993) was a Major League Baseball player and Hall of Fame right-handed pitcher with the Los Angeles Dodgers. Drysdale was one of the most dominant pitchers of the late 1950s and early to mid 1960s. He became a radio and television broadcaster after his playing career ended.

  23. Tom Seaver

    Tom Seaver


    George Thomas "Tom" Seaver (born November 17, 1944), nicknamed "Tom Terrific" and "The Franchise", is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. He pitched from 1967-1986 for four different teams in his career, but is noted primarily for his time with the New York Mets. During a 20-year career, Seaver compiled 311 wins, 3,640 strikeouts, 61 shutouts and a 2.86 earned run average. In 1992, he was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame by the highest percentage ever recorded (98.84%), and has the only plaque at Cooperstown wearing a New York Mets hat. As of 2010, Tom Seaver and Gil Hodges (played for the Mets in 1962-63) are the only Met players to have their jersey numbers retired by the team (Gil Hodges' number was retired as a manager even though he also played for the Mets).

  24. Ozzie Smith

    Ozzie Smith


    Osborne Earl "Ozzie" Smith (born December 26, 1954) is a retired American baseball shortstop who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the San Diego Padres and St. Louis Cardinals from 1978 to 1996. Nicknamed "The Wizard" for his defensive brilliance, Smith set major league records for career assists (8,375) and double plays (1,590) by a shortstop (the latter since broken by Omar Vizquel), as well as the National League (NL) record with 2,511 career games at the position; Smith won the NL Gold Glove Award for play at shortstop for 13 consecutive seasons (1980–92). A 15-time All-Star, he accumulated 2,460 hits and 580 stolen bases during his career, and won the NL Silver Slugger Award as the best-hitting shortstop in 1987. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility in 2002. He was also elected to the St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame in the inaugural class of 2014.

  25. Carlton Fisk

    Carlton Fisk


    Carlton Ernest Fisk (born December 26, 1947) is a retired Major League Baseball catcher. During a 24-year baseball career, he played for both the Boston Red Sox (1969, 1971–1980) and Chicago White Sox (1981–1993). The 6-foot-2-inch (1.88 m), 220-pound (100 kg) Fisk was known in the majors as "Pudge", his childhood nickname as he had been a chubby youngster, or "The Commander". He was the first player to be unanimously voted American League Rookie of the Year (1972).

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