Légion d'honneur refusals

Posted 5 years ago
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  1. Brigitte Bardot

    Brigitte Bardot


    Brigitte Anne-Marie Bardot (ˈbrɪɨt bɑrˈd; born 28 September 1934) is a French former actress, singer and fashion model, who later became an animal rights activist. She was one of the best known sex symbols of the 1950s and 1960s and was widely referred to by her initials. Starting in 1969, Bardot became the official face of Marianne (who had previously been anonymous) to represent the liberty of France.

  2. Georges Brassens

    Georges Brassens


    Georges Brassens (22 October 1921 – 29 October 1981) was a French singer-songwriter and poet.

  3. Simone de Beauvoir

    Simone de Beauvoir


    Simone Lucie Ernestine Marie Bertrand de Beauvoir, commonly known as Simone de Beauvoir (/bvˈwɑr/; 9 January 1908 – 14 April 1986), was a French writer, intellectual, existentialist philosopher, political activist, feminist and social theorist. Though she did not consider herself a philosopher, she had a significant influence on both feminist existentialism and feminist theory. De Beauvoir wrote novels, essays, biographies, autobiography and monographs on philosophy, politics and social issues. She is known for her 1949 treatise The Second Sex, a detailed analysis of women's oppression and a foundational tract of contemporary feminism; her novels, including She Came to Stay and The Mandarins; and her open relationship with French philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre.

  4. Maurice Ravel

    Maurice Ravel


    Joseph-Maurice Ravel (7 March 1875 – 28 December 1937) was a French composer, pianist and conductor. He is often associated with impressionism along with his elder contemporary Claude Debussy, although both composers rejected the term. In the 1920s and '30s Ravel was internationally regarded as France's greatest living composer.

  5. Léo Ferré

    Léo Ferré


    Léo Ferré (24 August 1916 – 14 July 1993) was a Monegasque French poet and composer, and a dynamic and controversial live performer, whose career in France dominated the years after the Second World War until his death. He released some forty albums over this period, composing the music and the majority of the lyrics. He released many hit singles, particularly between 1960 and the mid-seventies. Some of his songs have become classics of the French chanson repertoire, such as Avec le temps, C’est extra, Jolie Môme or Paris canaille.

  6. Jean-Paul Sartre

    Jean-Paul Sartre


    Jean-Paul Charles Aymard Sartre (/ˈsɑrtrə/; 21 June 1905 – 15 April 1980) was a French philosopher, playwright, novelist, political activist, biographer, and literary critic. He was one of the key figures in the philosophy of existentialism and phenomenology, and one of the leading figures in 20th-century French philosophy and Marxism.

  7. Albert Camus

    Albert Camus


    Albert Camus (7 November 1913 – 4 January 1960) was a French Nobel Prize–winning author, journalist, and philosopher. His views contributed to the rise of the philosophy known as absurdism. He wrote in his essay The Rebel that his whole life was devoted to opposing the philosophy of nihilism while still delving deeply into individual freedom.

  8. Marie Curie

    Marie Curie


    Marie Skłodowska-Curie (ˈkjʊri, kjʊˈri; 7 November 1867 – 4 July 1934) was a Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist who conducted pioneering research on radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, the first person and only woman to win twice, the only person to win twice in multiple sciences, and was part of the Curie family legacy of five Nobel Prizes. She was also the first woman to become a professor at the University of Paris, and in 1995 became the first woman to be entombed on her own merits in the Panthéon in Paris.

  9. Jacques Prévert

    Jacques Prévert


    Jacques Prévert (4 February 1900 – 11 April 1977) was a French poet and screenwriter. His poems became and remain popular in the French-speaking world, particularly in schools. His best regarded films formed part of the poetic realist movement, and include Les Enfants du Paradis (1945).

  10. Honore Daumier

    Honore Daumier


    Honoré Daumier (February 26, 1808 – February 10, 1879) was a French printmaker, caricaturist, painter, and sculptor, whose many works offer commentary on social and political life in France in the 19th century.

  11. Pierre Curie

    Pierre Curie


    Pierre Curie (ˈkjʊri, kjʊˈri; 15 May 1859 – 19 April 1906) was a French physicist, a pioneer in crystallography, magnetism, piezoelectricity and radioactivity. In 1903 he received the Nobel Prize in Physics with his wife, Marie Skłodowska-Curie, and Henri Becquerel, "in recognition of the extraordinary services they have rendered by their joint researches on the radiation phenomena discovered by Professor Henri Becquerel".

  12. Guy de Maupassant

    Guy de Maupassant


    Henri René Albert Guy de Maupassant (ˈmpəˌsɑːnt; 5 August 1850 – 6 July 1893) was a popular French writer, considered one of the fathers of the modern short story and one of the form's finest exponents.

  13. Gustave Courbet

    Gustave Courbet


    Jean Désiré Gustave Courbet (10 June 1819 – 31 December 1877) was a French painter who led the Realist movement in 19th-century French painting. Committed to painting only what he could see, he rejected academic convention and the Romanticism of the previous generation of visual artists. His independence set an example that was important to later artists, such as the Impressionists and the Cubists. Courbet occupies an important place in 19th-century French painting as an innovator and as an artist willing to make bold social statements through his work.

  14. Émile Littré

    Émile Littré


    Émile Maximilien Paul Littré (1 February 1801 – 2 June 1881) was a French lexicographer, freemason and philosopher, best known for his Dictionnaire de la langue française, commonly called "The Littré".

  15. Bernard Clavel

    Bernard Clavel


    Bernard Charles Henri Clavel (May 29, 1923 – October 5, 2010) was a French writer.

  16. Marcel Aymé

    Marcel Aymé


    Marcel Aymé (March 29, 1902 – October 14, 1967) was a French novelist, children's writer, humour writer and also a screenwriter and theatre playwright.

  17. Philippe Séguin

    Philippe Séguin


    Philippe Séguin (21 April 1943 – 7 January 2010) was a French political figure who was President of the National Assembly from 1993 to 1997 and President of the Cour des Comptes (Court of Financial Auditors) of France from 2004 to 2010.

  18. John Vianney

    John Vianney


    Jean-Baptiste-Marie Vianney, T.O.S.F., (8 May 1786 – 4 August 1859), commonly known in English as St John Vianney, was a French parish priest who is venerated in the Catholic Church as a saint and as the patron saint of all priests. He is often referred to as the "Curé d'Ars". He became internationally notable for his priestly and pastoral work in his parish because of the radical spiritual transformation of the community and its surroundings. Catholics attribute this to his saintly life, mortification, his persevering ministry in the sacrament of confession, and his ardent devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary and to Saint Philomena.

  19. Jacques Bouveresse

    Jacques Bouveresse


    Jacques Bouveresse (born August 20, 1940) is a philosopher who has written on subjects including Ludwig Wittgenstein, Robert Musil, Karl Kraus, philosophy of science, epistemology, philosophy of mathematics and analytical philosophy. Bouveresse has been called "an avis rara among the better known French philosophers in his championing of critical standards of thought."

  20. Georges Bernanos

    Georges Bernanos


    Georges Bernanos (20 February 1888 – 5 July 1948) was a French author, and a soldier in World War I. Of Roman Catholic and monarchist leanings, he was critical of bourgeois thought and was opposed to what he identified as defeatism. He thought this led to France's eventual occupation by Germany in 1940 during World War II. Most of his novels have been translated into English and frequently published in both Great Britain and the United States.

  21. Thomas Piketty

    Thomas Piketty


    Thomas Piketty (born on 7 May 1971) is a French economist who works on wealth and income inequality. He is a professor (directeur d'études) at the École des hautes études en sciences sociales (EHESS), professor at the Paris School of Economics and Centennial professor at the London School of Economics new International Inequalities Institute.

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