Harvard University faculty

Posted 6 years ago
The list "Harvard University faculty" has been viewed 42 times.
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  1. Harvard Business School faculty 0 views

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  2. Harvard Divinity School faculty 0 views

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  3. Harvard Law School faculty

    Harvard Law School faculty

     - 1 list, 185 members

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  4. Harvard Medical School faculty

    Harvard Medical School faculty

     - 1 list, 292 members

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  5. Radcliffe College faculty

     - 8 members
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  6. Harvard Graduate School of Design faculty 1 view

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  8. Harvard School of Public Health faculty 0 views

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  9. John F. Kennedy School of Government faculty 4 views

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  10. Professorships at Harvard University 0 views

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  1. Henry Kissinger

    Henry Kissinger


    Henry Alfred Kissinger (/ˈkɪsɪnər/; born Heinz Alfred Kissinger May 27, 1923) is an American diplomat and political scientist. He served as National Security Advisor and later concurrently as Secretary of State in the administrations of Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford. For his actions negotiating the ceasefire in Vietnam (which was ultimately never actualized), Kissinger received the 1973 Nobel Peace Prize under controversial circumstances, with two members of the committee resigning in protest. After his term, his opinion has still been sought by many subsequent U.S. presidents and other world leaders.

  2. Robert Reich

    Robert Reich


    Robert Bernard Reich (/ˈrʃ/; born June 24, 1946) is an American political economist, professor, author, and political commentator. He served in the administrations of Presidents Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter and was Secretary of Labor under President Bill Clinton from 1993 to 1997.

  3. Julian Bond

    Julian Bond


    Horace Julian Bond (January 14, 1940 – August 15, 2015) was an American social activist and leader in the Civil Rights Movement, politician, professor, and writer. While a student at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia, during the early 1960s, he helped to establish the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

  4. Kurt Vonnegut Jr.

    Kurt Vonnegut Jr.


    Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. (/ˈvɒnɨɡət/; November 11, 1922 – April 11, 2007) was an American author. In a career spanning over 50 years, Vonnegut published fourteen novels, three short story collections, five plays, and five works of non-fiction. He is most famous for his darkly satirical, best-selling novel Slaughterhouse-Five (1969).

  5. Dennis Lehane

    Dennis Lehane


    Dennis Lehane (born August 4, 1965) is an American author. He has written several novels; the first several were a series of mysteries featuring a couple of protagonists and other recurring characters, including A Drink Before the War. Of these, his fourth, Gone, Baby, Gone, was adapted as a 2007 film by the same name.

  6. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend

    Kathleen Kennedy Townsend


    Kathleen Hartington Kennedy Townsend (born July 4, 1951) is an American attorney who was the sixth Lieutenant Governor of Maryland from 1995 to 2003. She ran unsuccessfully for Governor of Maryland in 2002. In 2010 Townsend became the chair of the non-profit American Bridge, an organization that will raise funds for Democratic candidates and causes. She is a member of the Kennedy family.

  7. Henry Louis Gates

    Henry Louis Gates


    Wikipedia is hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation, a non-profit organization that also hosts a range of other projects:

  8. Rem Koolhaas

    Rem Koolhaas


    Remment Lucas "Rem" Koolhaas (born 17 November 1944) is a Dutch architect, architectural theorist, urbanist and Professor in Practice of Architecture and Urban Design at the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University. Koolhaas studied at the Architectural Association School of Architecture in London and at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. Koolhaas is the founding partner of OMA, and of its research-oriented counterpart AMO based in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. In 2005, he co-founded Volume Magazine together with Mark Wigley and Ole Bouman

  9. Cornel West

    Cornel West


    Cornel Ronald West (born June 2, 1953) is an American philosopher, academic, activist, author, public intellectual, and prominent member of the Democratic Socialists of America. The son of a Baptist minister, West received his undergraduate education at Harvard University, graduating with a bachelor's degree in 1973, and received a Ph.D at Princeton University in 1980, becoming the first African American to graduate from Princeton with a Ph.D in philosophy. He taught at Harvard in 2001 before leaving the school after a highly publicized dispute with then-president Lawrence Summers. He was Professor of African American Studies at Princeton before leaving the school in 2011 to become Professor of Philosophy and Christian Practice at the Union Theological Seminary in New York City. He has also spent time teaching at the University of Paris.

  10. Doris Kearns Goodwin

    Doris Kearns Goodwin


    Doris Kearns Goodwin (born January 4, 1943) is an American biographer, historian, and political commentator. She has authored biographies of several U.S. presidents, including Lyndon Johnson and the American Dream; The Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys: An American Saga; No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II (which won the Pulitzer Prize for History in 1995); Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln; and her most recent book, The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism.

  11. Timothy Leary

    Timothy Leary


    Timothy Francis Leary (October 22, 1920 – May 31, 1996) was an American psychologist and writer known for advocating psychedelic drugs. Leary conducted experiments under the Harvard Psilocybin Project during American legality of LSD and psilocybin, resulting in the Concord Prison Experiment and the Marsh Chapel Experiment. Leary and his associate Richard Alpert were fired by Harvard University amid controversy surrounding such drugs (although some have claimed that the experiments produced useful data).

  12. Robert Frost

    Robert Frost


    Robert Lee Frost (March26, 1874 – January29, 1963) was an American poet. His work was initially published in England before it was published in America. He is highly regarded for his realistic depictions of rural life and his command of American colloquial speech. His work frequently employed settings from rural life in New England in the early twentieth century, using them to examine complex social and philosophical themes. One of the most popular and critically respected American poets of the twentieth century, Frost was honored frequently during his lifetime, receiving four Pulitzer Prizes for Poetry. He became one of America's rare "public literary figures, almost an artistic institution." He was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 1960 for his poetical works. On July 22, 1961, Frost was named Poet laureate of Vermont.

  13. John Quincy Adams

    John Quincy Adams


    John Quincy Adams (ˈkwɪnzi; July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was an American statesman who served as the sixth President of the United States from 1825 to 1829. He also served as a diplomat, a Senator and member of the House of Representatives. He was a member of the Federalist, Democratic-Republican, National Republican, and later Anti-Masonic and Whig parties.

  14. John Lewis

    John Lewis


    John Aaron Lewis (May 3, 1920 – March 29, 2001) was an American jazz pianist, composer and arranger, best known as the musical director of the Modern Jazz Quartet.

  15. Kay Warren

    Kay Warren


    Kay Barbara Warren (born 1947) is an American academic anthropologist, known for her extensive research and publications in cultural anthropology studies. Initially trained as an anthropologist specializing in field studies of Latin American and Mesoamerican indigenous cultures, Warren has also written and lectured on an array of broader anthropological topics. These include studies about the impacts on politically marginalized and indigenous communities of social movements, wars and political violence, transnationalism, and foreign aid programs. As of 2009 Warren holds an endowed chair as the Charles C. Tillinghast Jr. ’32 Professor in International Studies at Brown University,. Before joining the faculty at Brown in 2003, Warren held professorships at both Harvard and Princeton universities.

  16. Eric Rosenfeld

    Eric Rosenfeld


    Eric R. Rosenfeld was a trader and principal at Long-Term Capital Management, a major hedge fund that failed during the Russian financial crisis.

  17. Daniel Patrick Moynihan

    Daniel Patrick Moynihan


    Daniel Patrick Moynihan (March 16, 1927 – March 26, 2003) was an American politician and sociologist. A member of the Democratic Party, he was first elected to the United States Senate for New York in 1976, and was re-elected three times (in 1982, 1988, and 1994). He declined to run for re-election in 2000. Prior to his years in the Senate, Moynihan was the United States' Ambassador to the United Nations and to India, and was a member of four successive presidential administrations, beginning with the administration of John F. Kennedy, and continuing through that of Gerald Ford.

  18. Hugo Münsterberg

    Hugo Münsterberg


    Hugo Münsterberg (June 1, 1863 – December 16, 1916) was a German-American psychologist. He was one of the pioneers in applied psychology, extending his research and theories to Industrial/Organizational (I/O), legal, medical, clinical, educational and business settings. Münsterberg encountered immense turmoil with the outbreak of the First World War. Torn between his loyalty to America and his homeland, he often defended Germany's actions, attracting highly contrasting reactions.

  19. B. F. Skinner

    B. F. Skinner


    Burrhus Frederic (B. F.) Skinner (March 20, 1904 – August 18, 1990) was an American psychologist, behaviorist, author, inventor, and social philosopher. He was the Edgar Pierce Professor of Psychology at Harvard University from 1958 until his retirement in 1974.

  20. David Gergen

    David Gergen


    David Richmond Gergen (born May 9, 1942) is an American political commentator and former presidential advisor who served during the administrations of Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan, and Bill Clinton. He is currently a Senior Political Analyst for CNN and a Professor of Public Service and Co-Director of the Center for Public Leadership at the Harvard Kennedy School. Gergen is also the former Editor-at-Large of U.S. News and World Report and a contributor to CNN.com and Parade Magazine. He has twice been a member of election coverage teams that won Peabody awards—in 1988 with MacNeil-Lehrer, and in 2008 with CNN.

  21. John Thomas Dunlop

    John Thomas Dunlop


    John Thomas Dunlop (July 5, 1914 – October 2, 2003) was an American administrator and labor scholar.

  22. Ingrid Rossellini

    Ingrid Rossellini


    Ingrid Bergman (29 August 1915 – 29 August 1982) was a Swedish actress who starred in a variety of European and American films. She won three Academy Awards, two Emmy Awards, four Golden Globe Awards, a BAFTA Award and the Tony Award for Best Actress. She is best remembered for her roles as Ilsa Lund in Casablanca (1942), and as Alicia Huberman in Notorious (1946), an Alfred Hitchcock thriller starring Cary Grant.

  23. Robert Burns Woodward

    Robert Burns Woodward


    Robert Burns Woodward (April 10, 1917 – July 8, 1979) was an American organic chemist. He is considered by many to be the preeminent organic chemist of the twentieth century, having made many key contributions to the subject, especially in the synthesis of complex natural products and the determination of their molecular structure. He also worked closely with Roald Hoffmann on theoretical studies of chemical reactions. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1965.

  24. Zaha Hadid

    Zaha Hadid


    Dame Zaha Mohammad Hadid, DBE (Arabic: زها حديدZahā Ḥadīd; born 31 October 1950) is an Iraqi-British architect. In 2004 she became the first woman recipient of the Pritzker Architecture Prize. She received the Stirling Prize in 2010 and 2011. In 2012 she was made a dame. In 2014 the Heydar Aliyev Cultural Centre, designed by her, won the Design Museum Design of the Year Award, making her the first woman to win the top prize in that competition. In 2015 she became the first woman to be awarded the RIBA Gold Medal in her own right.

  25. Wole Soyinka

    Wole Soyinka


    Akinwande Oluwole "Wole" Babatunde Soyinka (Yoruba: Oluwo̩lé S̩óyinká, pronounced "Shoyinka"; born 13 July 1934) is a Nigerian playwright and poet. He was awarded the 1986 Nobel Prize in Literature, the first African to be honored.

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