Fascism

Posted May 4, 2011
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  1. Adolf Hitler
    #1

    Adolf Hitler

    219,843 views

    Adolf Hitler (20 April 1889 – 30 April 1945) was a German politician who was the leader of the Nazi Party (Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei; NSDAP), Chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945, and Führer ("leader") of Nazi Germany from 1934 to 1945. As dictator of Nazi Germany, he initiated World War II in Europe with the invasion of Poland in September 1939 and was a central figure of the Holocaust.


  2. Benito Mussolini
    #2

    Benito Mussolini

    29,231 views

    Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini (29 July 1883 – 28 April 1945) was an Italian politician, journalist, and leader of the National Fascist Party, ruling the country as Prime Minister from 1922 until his ousting in 1943. He ruled constitutionally until 1925, when he dropped all pretense of democracy and set up a legal dictatorship. Known as Il Duce ("the leader"), Mussolini was the founder of fascism.


  3. Joseph Goebbels
    #3

    Joseph Goebbels

    3,325 views

    Paul Joseph Goebbels (/ˈɡɜrbəlz/; 29 October 1897 – 1 May 1945) was a German politician and Reich Minister of Propaganda in Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1945. One of Adolf Hitler's close associates and most devoted followers, he was known for his public speaking and deep and virulent antisemitism, which led to his supporting the extermination of the Jews in the Holocaust.


  4. Giovanni Gentile
    #4

    Giovanni Gentile

    461 views

    Giovanni Gentile (May 30, 1875 – April 15, 1944) was an Italian neo-Hegelian Idealist philosopher and politician, a peer of Benedetto Croce. He described himself as 'the philosopher of Fascism', and ghostwrote A Doctrine of Fascism (1932) for Benito Mussolini. He also devised his own system of philosophy, Actual Idealism.


  5. Triumph of the Will
    #5

    Triumph of the Will (1935)

    488 views

    Triumph of the Will (German: Triumph des Willens) is a 1935 German propaganda film directed, produced, edited, and co-written by Leni Riefenstahl. It chronicles the 1934 Nazi Party Congress in Nuremberg, which was attended by more than 700,000 Nazi supporters. The film contains excerpts from speeches given by Nazi leaders at the Congress, including Adolf Hitler, Rudolf Hess, and Julius Streicher, interspersed with footage of massed Sturmabteilung and Schutzstaffel troops and public reaction. Hitler commissioned the film and served as an unofficial executive producer; his name appears in the opening titles. The film's overriding theme is the return of Germany as a great power, with Hitler as the leader who will bring glory to the nation. Because the film was made after the 1934 Night of the Long Knives (on June 30) many prominent Sturmabteilung (SA) members are absent—they were murdered in that Party purge, organized and orchestrated by Hitler to replace the SA with the Schutzstaffeln (SS) as his main paramilitary force.


  6. Francisco Franco
    #6

    Francisco Franco

    398 views

    Francisco Paulino Hermenegildo Teódulo Franco Bahamonde (4 December 1892 – 20 November 1975) was a Spanish general and the Caudillo of Spain from 1936/1939 until his death in 1975. Coming from a military family background, he became the youngest general in Spain and one of the youngest generals in Europe in the 1920s.


  7. Léon Degrelle
    #7

    Léon Degrelle

    294 views

    Léon Joseph Marie Ignace Degrelle (15 June 1906 – 31 March 1994) was a Walloon Belgian politician, who founded Rexism and later joined the Waffen SS (becoming a leader of its Walloon contingent) which were front-line troops in the fight against the Soviet Union. After World War II, he was a prominent figure in fascist movements.


  8. Ante Pavelic
    #8

    Ante Pavelic

    275 views

    Ante Pavelić (14 July 1889 – 28 December 1959) was a Croatian fascist dictator who led the Ustaše movement and Independent State of Croatia (NDH), a puppet state of Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany that was established in parts of occupied Yugoslavia during World War II, pursuing genocidal policies against ethnic and racial minorities.


  9. Diana Mitford
    #9

    Diana Mitford

    289 views

    Diana, Lady Mosley (17 June 1910 – 11 August 2003), born Diana Freeman-Mitford and usually known as Diana Mitford, was one of Britain's noted Mitford sisters. She was married first to Bryan Walter Guinness, heir to the barony of Moyne, and secondly to Sir Oswald Mosley, 6th Baronet, of Ancoats, leader of the British Union of Fascists. Her second marriage, in 1936, took place at the home of Joseph Goebbels, with Adolf Hitler as guest of honour. Subsequently her involvement with right-wing political causes resulted in three years' internment during the Second World War. She later moved to Paris and enjoyed some success as a writer. In the 1950s she contributed diaries to Tatler and edited the magazine The European. In 1977 she published her autobiography, A Life of Contrasts, and two more biographies in the 1980s. She was also a regular book reviewer for Books & Bookmen and later at The Evening Standard in the 1990s. She caused controversy when she appeared on Desert Island Discs in 1989. A family friend, James Lees-Milne, wrote of her beauty, "She was the nearest thing to Botticelli's Venus that I have ever seen".


  10. William Joyce
    #10

    William Joyce

    192 views

    Wikipedia is hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation, a non-profit organization that also hosts a range of other projects:


  11. Victor Emmanuel III of Italy
    #11

    Victor Emmanuel III of Italy

    142 views

    Victor Emmanuel III (Italian: Vittorio Emanuele III, Albanian: Viktor Emanueli III; 11 November 1869 – 28 December 1947) was the King of Italy from 29 July 1900 until his abdication on 9 May 1946. In addition, he claimed the thrones of Ethiopia and Albania as Emperor of Ethiopia (1936–41) and King of the Albanians (1939–43), which were not recognised by all great powers. During his long reign (45 years), which began after the assassination of his father Umberto I, the Kingdom of Italy became involved in two World Wars. His reign also encompassed the birth, rise, and fall of Italian Fascism.


  12. Vidkun Quisling
    #12

    Vidkun Quisling

    52 views

    Vidkun Abraham Lauritz Jonssøn Quisling (18 July 1887 – 24 October 1945) was a Norwegian military officer and politician, mostly known as the nominal head of government of Norway after the country was occupied by Nazi Germany during World War II.


  13. Tag der Freiheit - Unsere Wehrmacht
    #13

    Tag der Freiheit - Unsere Wehrmacht (1935)

    65 views

    Tag der Freiheit: Unsere Wehrmacht (English: Day of Freedom: Our Armed Forces) is the third documentary directed by Leni Riefenstahl, following Victory of Faith and Triumph of the Will. Her third film recounts the Seventh Party Rally of the Nazi Party, which occurred in Nuremberg in 1935, and focuses on the German army.


  14. Ion Antonescu
    #14

    Ion Antonescu

    53 views

    Ion Victor Antonescu (June 15, 1882 – June 1, 1946) was a Romanian soldier and authoritarian politician who, as the Prime Minister and Conducător during most of World War II, presided over two successive wartime dictatorships. After the war, he was convicted of war crimes and executed.


  15. Ferenc Szálasi
    #15

    Ferenc Szálasi

    48 views

    Ferenc Szálasi (6 January 1897 – 12 March 1946) was the leader of the fascist Arrow Cross Party – Hungarist Movement, the "Leader of the Nation" (Nemzetvezető), being both Head of State and Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Hungary's "Government of National Unity" (Nemzeti Összefogás Kormánya) for the final six months of Hungary's participation in World War II, after Germany occupied Hungary and removed Miklós Horthy by force. During his brief rule, Szálasi's men murdered 10,000–15,000 Jews. After the war, he was executed after a trial by the Hungarian court for crimes against the state committed during World War II.


  16. Ikki Kita
    #16

    Ikki Kita

    48 views

    Ikki Kita (北 一輝 Kita Ikki, 3 April 1883 – 19 August 1937) (real name: Kita Terujirō (北 輝次郎)) was a Japanese author, intellectual and a political philosopher who was active in early-Shōwa period Japan. A harsh critic of the Emperor system and the Meiji constitution, he claimed that the Japanese were not the emperor's people, rather the Emperor was the “people's emperor.” He advocated a complete reconstructing of Sanjana's body along the lines of his own version of state socialism. Kita was in contact with many people within the extreme right and wrote pamphlets and books. The government saw Kita´s ideas as disruptive and dangerous, in 1937 he was implicated, although not directly involved in a failed coup attempt and executed. He is still widely read in academic circles in Japan.


  17. Nesta Helen Webster
    #17

    Nesta Helen Webster

    40 views

    Nesta Helen Webster (Mrs. Arthur Webster), (24 August 1876 – 16 May 1960) was a controversial author who revived conspiracy theories about the Illuminati. She argued that the secret society's members were occultists, plotting communist world domination, using the idea of a Jewish cabal, the Masons and Jesuits as a smokescreen. According to her, their international subversion included the French Revolution, 1848 Revolution, the First World War, and the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917.


  18. Anastasy Vonsyatsky
    #18

    Anastasy Vonsyatsky

    42 views

    Anastasy Andreyevich Vonsyatsky (Russian: Анаста́сий Андре́евич Вонся́цкий, Polish: Anastazy Wąsacki; June 12, 1898 – February 5, 1965), better known in the United States as Anastase Andreivitch Vonsiatsky, was a Russian anti-Bolshevik émigré and fascist leader based in the United States from the 1920s.


  19. Henry Hamilton Beamish
    #19

    Henry Hamilton Beamish

    36 views

    Henry Hamilton Beamish (2 June 1873 - 27 March 1948) was a leading British antisemite and the founder of The Britons.


  20. Corneliu Zelea Codreanu
    #20

    Corneliu Zelea Codreanu

    37 views

    Corneliu Zelea Codreanu (September 13, 1899 – November 30, 1938)—born Corneliu Zelinski and commonly known as Corneliu Codreanu—was a Romanian politician of the far right, the founder and charismatic leader of the Iron Guard or The Legion of the Archangel Michael (also known as the Legionary Movement), an ultra-nationalist and violently antisemitic organization active throughout most of the interwar period. Generally seen as the main variety of local fascism, and noted for its mystical and Romanian Orthodox-inspired revolutionary message, it grew into an important actor on the Romanian political stage, coming into conflict with the political establishment and democratic forces, and often resorted to terrorism. The Legionaries traditionally referred to Codreanu as Căpitanul ("The Captain"), and he held absolute authority over the organization until his death.


  21. José Antonio Primo de Rivera
    #21

    José Antonio Primo de Rivera

    34 views

    José Antonio Primo de Rivera y Sáenz de Heredia, 1st Duke of Primo de Rivera, 3rd Marquis of Estella, GE (April 24, 1903 – November 20, 1936) was a Spanish lawyer, nobleman, politician, and founder of the Falange Española ("Spanish Phalanx"). He was executed by the Spanish republican government during the course of the Spanish Civil War.


  22. Sadao Araki
    #22

    Sadao Araki

    35 views

    Sadao Araki (荒木 貞夫 Araki Sadao, May 26, 1877 – November 2, 1966) was a general in the Imperial Japanese Army before and during World War II. As one of the principal nationalist right-wing political theorists in the Empire of Japan, he was regarded as the leader of the radical faction within the politicized Imperial Japanese Army and served as Minister of War under Prime Minister Inukai. He later served as Minister of Education during the Konoe and Hiranuma administrations. After WWII, he was convicted of war crimes and given a life sentence.


  23. Eoin O'Duffy
    #23

    Eoin O'Duffy

    33 views

    Eoin O'Duffy (Irish: Eoin Ó Dubhthaigh; 30 October 1892 – 30 November 1944) was an Irish political activist, soldier and police commissioner. O'Duffy was the leader of the Monaghan Brigade of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) during the Irish War of Independence and in this capacity became Chief of Staff of the IRA in 1922. He was one of the Irish activists who along with Michael Collins accepted the Anglo-Irish Treaty and fought as a general in the Irish Civil War on the pro-Treaty side.


  24. Ioannis Metaxas
    #24

    Ioannis Metaxas

    34 views

    Ioannis Metaxas (Greek: Ιωάννης Μεταξάς; 12 April 1871 – 29 January 1941) was a Greek general and dictator, serving as Prime Minister of Greece from 1936 until his death in 1941. He governed constitutionally for the first four months of his tenure, and thereafter as the strongman of the 4th of August Regime.


  25. Konstantin Rodzaevsky
    #25

    Konstantin Rodzaevsky

    33 views

    Konstantin Vladimirovich Rodzaevsky (Russian: Константи́н Влади́мирович Родзае́вский; 11 August 1907 – 30 August 1946) was the leader of the Russian Fascist Party, which he led in exile from Manchuria, chief editor of the RFP "Nash Put'".


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