Counts of Poitiers

Posted 4 years ago
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See also Counts of France

  1. Eleanor of Aquitaine

    Eleanor of Aquitaine


    Eleanor of Aquitaine (in French: Aliénor d’Aquitaine, Éléonore de Guyenne) (1122 or 1124 – 1 April 1204) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Western Europe during the High Middle Ages. As well as being Duchess of Aquitaine in her own right, she was queen consort of France (1137–1152) and of England (1154–1189). Eleanor of Aquitaine is the only woman to have been queen of both France and England. She was the patroness of such literary figures as Wace, Benoît de Sainte-More, and Chrétien de Troyes.

  2. Henry II of England

    Henry II of England


    Henry II (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as King of England (1154–1189), Count of Anjou, Count of Maine, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Count of Nantes, Lord of Ireland and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland and western France. Henry, the great-grandson of William the Conqueror, was the first of the House of Plantagenet to rule England. Henry was the first to use the title "King of England" (as opposed to "King of the English").

  3. Louis VII of France

    Louis VII of France


    Louis VII (called the Younger or the Young) (French: ) (1120 – 18 September 1180) was King of France, the son and successor of Louis VI (hence his nickname). He ruled from 1137 until his death. He was part of the genetic ascendancy of the House of Capet. His reign was dominated by feudal struggles (in particular with the Angevin family), and saw the beginning of the long feud between France and England. It also saw the beginning of construction on Notre-Dame de Paris, the founding of the University of Paris and the disastrous Second Crusade.

  4. William V, Duke of Aquitaine

    William V, Duke of Aquitaine


    William V (969 – 31 January 1030), called the Great (le Grand), was Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou (as William II or III) from 990 until his death. He was the son and successor of William IV by his wife Emma of Blois, daughter of Theobald I of Blois. He seems to have taken after his formidable mother, who ruled Aquitaine as regent until 1004. He was a friend to Bishop Fulbert of Chartres, who found in him another Maecenas, and founded a cathedral school at Poitiers. He himself was very well educated, a collector of books, and turned the prosperous court of Aquitaine into the learning centre of Southern France.

  5. William IX, Duke of Aquitaine

    William IX, Duke of Aquitaine


    William IX (Occitan: ; French: ) (22 October 1071 – 10 February 1126), called the Troubador, was the Duke of Aquitaine and Gascony and Count of Poitou (as William VII) between 1086 and his death. He was also one of the leaders of the Crusade of 1101. Though his political and military achievements have certain historical importance, he's best known as the earliest troubadour — a vernacular lyric poet in the Occitan language — whose work survived.

  6. Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall

    Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall


    Richard of Cornwall (5 January 1209 – 2 April 1272) was Count of Poitou (from 1225 to 1243), 1st Earl of Cornwall (from 1225) and German King (formally "King of the Romans", from 1257). One of the wealthiest men in Europe, he also joined the Sixth Crusade, where he achieved success as a negotiator for the release of prisoners, and assisted with the building of the citadel in Ascalon.

  7. John, Dauphin of France, Duke of Touraine

    John, Dauphin of France, Duke of Touraine


    John, Dauphin of France and Duke of Touraine (31 August 1398 – 5 April 1417) was the fourth son and ninth child of Charles VI of France and Isabella of Bavaria-Ingolstadt. He was born in Paris. After his three elder brothers died, he became Dauphin in 1415. In 1406 he married Jacqueline, heiress of the County of Hainaut, Holland, Zealand, and Frisia.

  8. Alfonso, Count of Poitiers

    Alfonso, Count of Poitiers


    Alfonso or Alphonse (11 November 1220 – 21 August 1271) was the Count of Poitou from 1225 and Count of Toulouse (as Alfonso II) from 1247.

  9. William VII, Duke of Aquitaine

    William VII, Duke of Aquitaine


    William VII (born Peter, Pierre-Guillaume) (1023 – Autumn 1058), called the Eagle (Aigret) or the Bold (le Hardi), was the duke of Aquitaine and count of Poitou (as William V) between 1039 and his death, following his half-brother Odo.

  10. Odo of Gascony

    Odo of Gascony


    Odo (French: or Odon, Latin: ; c. 1010 – 10 March 1039) was Duke of Gascony from 1032 and then Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou from 1038.

  11. William VI, Duke of Aquitaine

    William VI, Duke of Aquitaine

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    William VI (1004 – March 1038), called the Fat, was Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou (as William IV) between 1030 and his death. He was the eldest son of William V the Great by his first wife, Adalmode of Limoges.

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