Commissioner's Historic Achievement Award

Posted 5 years ago
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This list has 13 members.

  1. Derek Jeter

    Derek Jeter


    Derek Sanderson Jeter (/ˈtər/ JEE-tər) (born June 26, 1974) is an American former professional baseball shortstop who played 20 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees. A five-time World Series champion, Jeter is regarded as a central figure of the Yankees' success of the late 1990s and early 2000s for his hitting, baserunning, fielding, and leadership. He is the Yankees' all-time career leader in hits (3,465), doubles (544), games played (2,747), stolen bases (358), times on base (4,716), plate appearances (12,602) and at bats (11,195). His accolades include 14 All-Star selections, five Gold Glove Awards, five Silver Slugger Awards, two Hank Aaron Awards, and a Roberto Clemente Award. Jeter became the 28th player to reach 3,000 hits and finished his career sixth all-time in career hits and the all-time MLB leader in hits by a shortstop.

  2. Roger Clemens

    Roger Clemens


    William Roger Clemens (born August 4, 1962), nicknamed "Rocket", is a retired American baseball pitcher who played 24 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for four teams. Clemens was one of the most dominant pitchers in major league history, tallying 354 wins, a 3.12 earned run average (ERA), and 4,672 strikeouts, the third-most all time. An 11-time All-Star and two-time World Series champion, he won seven Cy Young Awards during his career, the most of any pitcher in history. Clemens was known for his fierce competitive nature and hard-throwing pitching style, which he used to intimidate batters.

  3. Sammy Sosa

    Sammy Sosa


    Samuel Kelvin "Sammy" Peralta Sosa (born November 12, 1968) is a Dominican retired professional baseball right fielder. Sosa played with four Major League Baseball teams over his career, which spanned from 1989 to 2007. Sosa's Major League career began with the Texas Rangers in 1989. After three seasons with the Chicago White Sox, Sosa became a member of the Chicago Cubs in 1992 and became one of the league's best hitters. Sosa hit his 400th home runs in his 1,354th game and his 5,273rd at-bat, the quickest in National League history. In 1998, Sosa and Mark McGwire achieved national fame for their home run-hitting prowess in pursuit of Roger Maris' home run record.

  4. Mark McGwire

    Mark McGwire


    Mark David McGwire (born October 1, 1963), nicknamed "Big Mac", is an American former professional baseball player currently serving as the hitting coach for the Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball (MLB). As a first baseman, his MLB career spanned from 1986 to 2001 while playing for the Oakland Athletics and the St. Louis Cardinals. He quickly grabbed media attention in 1987 as a rookie with the Athletics by hitting 33 home runs before the All-Star break, and would lead the major leagues in home runs that year with 49, setting the single-season rookie record. He appeared in six straight All-Star Games from 1987 to 1992 despite a brief career decline related to injuries. Another string of six consecutive All-Star appearances followed from 1995 to 2001. Each season from 1996 to 1999, he again led the major leagues in home runs.

  5. Ken Griffey Jr.

    Ken Griffey Jr.


    George Kenneth "Ken" Griffey, Jr. (born November 21, 1969), nicknamed "Junior" and "The Kid", is an American former professional baseball outfielder who played 22 years in Major League Baseball (MLB) for three teams (1989–2010). He spent most of his career with the Seattle Mariners and Cincinnati Reds, along with a short stint with the Chicago White Sox. A 13-time All-Star, Griffey was one of the most prolific home run hitters in baseball history; his 630 home runs rank as the sixth-most in MLB history. Griffey was also an exceptional defender and won 10 Gold Glove Awards in center field. He is tied for the record of most consecutive games with a home run (8 games, tied with Don Mattingly and Dale Long).

  6. Mariano Rivera

    Mariano Rivera


    Mariano Rivera (born November 29, 1969) is a Panamanian former professional baseball pitcher who played 19 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees, from 1995 to 2013. Nicknamed "Mo" and "Sandman", Rivera spent most of his career as a relief pitcher and served as the Yankees' closer for 17 seasons. A thirteen-time All-Star and five-time World Series champion, he is MLB's career leader in saves (652) and games finished (952). Rivera won five American League (AL) Rolaids Relief Man Awards and three Delivery Man of the Year Awards, and he finished in the top three in voting for the AL Cy Young Award four times.

  7. Tony Gwynn

    Tony Gwynn


    Anthony Keith "Tony" Gwynn, Sr. (May 9, 1960 – June 16, 2014), nicknamed "Mr. Padre", was an American professional baseball right fielder who played 20 seasons (1982–2001) in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the San Diego Padres. The left-handed hitting Gwynn won eight batting titles in his career, tied for the most in National League (NL) history. He is considered one of the best and most consistent hitters in baseball history. He had a .338 career batting average, never hitting below .309 in any full season. Gwynn was a 15-time All-Star, recognized for his skills both on offense and defense with seven Silver Slugger Awards and five Gold Glove Awards. He was the rare player in his era that stayed with a single team his entire career, and he played in the only two World Series appearances in San Diego's franchise history. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2007, his first year of eligibility.

  8. Cal Ripken

    Cal Ripken


    Calvin Edwin "Cal" Ripken, Jr. (born August 24, 1960), nicknamed "The Iron Man", is an American former baseball shortstop and third baseman who played 21 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Baltimore Orioles (1981–2001). One of his position's most offensively productive players, Ripken compiled 3,184 hits, 431 home runs, and 1,695 runs batted in during his career, and he won two Gold Glove Awards for his defense. He was a 19-time All-Star and was twice named American League (AL) Most Valuable Player (MVP). Ripken is best known for holding the record for consecutive games played, 2,632, surpassing Lou Gehrig's streak of 2,130 that had stood for 56 years and that many deemed unbreakable. In 2007, he was elected into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility.

  9. Vin Scully

    Vin Scully


    Vincent Edward "Vin" Scully (born November 29, 1927) is an American sportscaster, best known as the play-by-play announcer for the Los Angeles Dodgers MLB team. He has been with the team since its days in Brooklyn. His 66 seasons with the Dodgers (1950–present) are the longest time any broadcaster has been with a single team in professional sports history, and he is second by one year to only Tommy Lasorda in terms of number of years with the Dodgers organization in any capacity.

  10. Ichirô Suzuki

    Ichirô Suzuki


    Ichiro Suzuki (鈴木 一朗 Suzuki Ichirō), often referred to mononymously as Ichiro (イチロー Ichirō) (born October 22, 1973), is a Japanese professional baseball right fielder for the Miami Marlins of Major League Baseball (MLB). Originally a player in Japan's Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB), Ichiro moved to the United States in 2001 to play in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Seattle Mariners, with whom he spent 11 seasons, and later the New York Yankees. Ichiro has established a number of batting records, including MLB's single-season record for hits with 262. He had 10 consecutive 200-hit seasons, the longest streak by any player in history. Between his career hits in Japan's and America's major leagues, Ichiro stands at second place all-time in top-flight hits, trailing only Pete Rose.

  11. Rickey Henderson

    Rickey Henderson


    Rickey Nelson Henley Henderson (born December 25, 1958) is a retired American baseball left fielder who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for nine teams from 1979 to 2003, including four stints with his original team, the Oakland Athletics. Nicknamed "The Man of Steal", he is widely regarded as the sport's greatest leadoff hitter and baserunner. He holds the major league records for career stolen bases, runs, unintentional walks and leadoff home runs. At the time of his last major league game in 2003, the ten-time American League (AL) All-Star ranked among the sport's top 100 all-time home run hitters and was its all-time leader in base on balls. In 2009, he was inducted to the Baseball Hall of Fame on his first ballot appearance.

  12. Rachel Robinson

    Rachel Robinson


    Rachel Robinson (born Rachel Annetta Isum; July 19, 1922) is a former nurse and the widow of baseball player Jackie Robinson. She was born in Los Angeles, and attended the University of California, Los Angeles. There, she met Jackie in 1941, and they married in 1946, the year before Robinson broke into the big leagues. Their son, Jackie Robinson, Jr., was born in November 1946. The Robinsons would later have a daughter, Sharon, and another son, David.

  13. Seattle Mariners

    Seattle Mariners


    The Seattle Mariners are an American professional baseball team based in Seattle, Washington. Enfranchised in 1977, the Mariners are a member of the Western Division of Major League Baseball's American League. Since July 1999, the Mariners' home ballpark has been Safeco Field, located south of downtown Seattle. From the team's inception in 1977 until June 1999, the club's home ballpark was the Kingdome. Through the 2014 season, the franchise has finished with a losing record in 26 of 38 seasons.

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