Cat Stevens albums

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  1. Harold and Maude

    Harold and Maude (1971)


    Harold and Maude is a 1971 American romantic dark comedy directed by Hal Ashby and released by Paramount Pictures. It incorporates elements of dark humor and existentialist drama, with a plot that revolves around the exploits of a young man named Harold (played by Bud Cort) intrigued with death. Harold drifts away from the life that his detached mother (Vivian Pickles) prescribes for him, and slowly develops quite a strong and close friendship and eventually a romantic relationship with a 79-year-old woman named Maude (Ruth Gordon) who teaches Harold about living life to its fullest and that life is the most precious gift of all.

  2. Teaser And The Firecat

    Teaser And The Firecat (2000)


    Teaser and the Firecat is the fifth studio album released by Cat Stevens in 1971. It contains 10 songs including the hits "Morning Has Broken," "Moonshadow," and "Peace Train." It is also the title of a children's book written and illustrated by Stevens. The story features the title characters from the album cover, top-hatted young Teaser and his pet Firecat, who attempt to put the moon back in its place after it falls from the sky. Published in 1972, the book has been out of print since the mid-1970s.

  3. Tea for the Tillerman

    Tea for the Tillerman (2000)


    Tea for the Tillerman is the fourth studio album by the singer-songwriter Cat Stevens. This album, Stevens' second during 1970, includes many of Stevens' best-known songs including "Where Do the Children Play?", "Hard Headed Woman", "Wild World", "Sad Lisa", "Into White", and "Father and Son". Four of the tracks ("Where Do the Children Play?", "On the Road to Find Out", "Tea for the Tillerman", and "Miles from Nowhere") were featured in the Hal Ashby and Colin Higgins' black comedy film Harold and Maude, in 1971. The track "But I Might Die Tonight" was featured in a film the year before, in 1970: Deep End, directed by Jerzy Skolimowski. Stevens, a former art student, created the artwork featured on the record's cover. "Tea for the Tillerman" was also used over the end credits for the BBC TV show Extras. "Miles From Nowhere" also appeared in the A-Team episode, "Alive At Five" while Templeton Peck is running away.

  4. Catch Bull At Four

    Catch Bull At Four (2000)


    Catch Bull at Four is the sixth studio album by Cat Stevens. In the United States it spent three weeks at number one on Billboard's album chart. The title is taken from one of the Ten Bulls of Zen.

  5. Matthew & Son

    Matthew & Son (2004)


    Matthew and Son is the first album by English singer-songwriter, Cat Stevens. Stevens began writing songs during his early teenage years. His earliest influences included the sound of early British bands, like the Beatles and the Rolling Stones, influenced by popular American Rhythm and Blues music. At the same time, folk influences from artists like Bob Dylan and Simon & Garfunkel left a strong mark on him, along with some of the musicals being performed so close to his childhood home in Soho, that often he could hear the songs drifting up through his room. Stevens' brother, David Gordon, attracted the attention of Mike Hurst, (formerly of the The Springfields) in hopes of finding a producer interested in his younger brother's music, and after a demo was recorded, a deal was struck between the two. The album was not released until 1967; however, recording began on July 10, 1966, with a few advance singles appearing around that time.

  6. Buddha And The Chocolate Box

    Buddha And The Chocolate Box (2000)


    Buddha and the Chocolate Box is the eighth studio album by Cat Stevens. The title came to Stevens when he was travelling to a gig on a plane with a Buddha in one hand and a box of chocolates in the other. He pondered that if he were to die in the plane these would be the last objects with him, and he would be caught between the spiritual and the material. The album leans towards the spiritual path, and is an indication of the direction his life would follow.

  7. Foreigner

    Foreigner (2000)


    Foreigner is the seventh studio album released by English singer-songwriter, Cat Stevens in July 1973. In addition to the minor hit "The Hurt", which received a moderate amount of airplay, Foreigner also included such songs as "100 I Dream" and the 18-minute-long "Foreigner Suite", which took up the entirety of side one.

  8. Back to Earth

    Back to Earth (1978)


    Back to Earth is the eleventh studio album released by the British singer/songwriter Cat Stevens. It was the only album he recorded using the name Cat Stevens after his conversion to Islam in December 1977. It was also the last album of contemporary western music that he recorded until An Other Cup, nearly 30 years later.

  9. Harold And Maude

    Harold And Maude (2007)


    Harold and Maude is a 1971 American dark comedy film directed by Hal Ashby and released by Paramount Pictures. It incorporates elements of dark humor and existentialist drama, with a plot that revolves around the exploits of a young man intrigued with death, Harold (played by Bud Cort). Harold drifts away from the life that his detached mother prescribes for him, and develops a relationship with an old woman named Maude (played by Ruth Gordon).

  10. Mona Bone Jakon

    Mona Bone Jakon (2001)


    Mona Bone Jakon is the third studio album released by singer-songwriter Cat Stevens. The album was released in July 1970 on the Island Records label in the United Kingdom, and A&M record label in the United States and Canada. After a meteoric start to his career, surprising even his original producer at Deram Records with the hit singles "I Love My Dog", "Matthew and Son", and "I'm Gonna Get Me a Gun", Stevens' debut album, Matthew and Son began charting as well. However, after the pressure for a repeat album of the same calibre, Stevens, considered a young teen sensation, was overwhelmed by a new lifestyle, as well as the demands of writing, recording, performing, publicity appearances, and touring. In the fall of 1968, he collapsed, with the diagnosis of tuberculosis and a collapsed lung. For over a year, while recovering, Stevens virtually disappeared from the British pop scene. Mona Bone Jakon is notable not only for his return, but for the emergence of a very different artist. The album was certified gold for sales/shipments of more than 500,000 copies in the United States.

  11. Numbers

    Numbers (1975)


    Numbers is the ninth studio album, and the first concept album by singer/songwriter Cat Stevens released in November 1975.

  12. New Masters

    New Masters (2008)


    New Masters is the second studio album by singer-songwriter Cat Stevens. The album was released in December 1967 by Deram Records, a new subsidiary of Decca Records as a follow up to the highly successful debut album, Matthew and Son. The label was disappointed by his second album's poor sales, given that the previous album made the UK Top Ten and produced several hit singles. New Masters generated little interest, failing to chart in either the U.K. or the United States. The single "Kitty"/"Blackness of the Night" languished at number 47, becoming Stevens' first single to miss the top 40. This was a sudden and steep commercial decline from the considerable success that Stevens enjoyed with his earlier recordings.

  13. Izitso

    Izitso (2001)


    Izitso is the tenth studio album released by the British singer-songwriter Cat Stevens (now Yusuf Islam) in April 1977. After the lackluster Numbers, the album proved to be his comeback. The album updated the rhythmic folk rock and pop rock style of his earlier albums with the extensive use of synthesizers and other electronic music instruments, giving the album a more electronic rock and synthpop style, and anticipating elements of electro.

  14. The Life of the Last Prophet

    The Life of the Last Prophet


    The Life of the Last Prophet was the first album to be released by Yusuf Islam (after leaving the Western pop music business in 1978, when he was known as Cat Stevens). After that time, he recorded only albums with Islamic themes, including recordings for children to learn both the Arabic alphabet and basic tenets of Islam. This album is both an attempt to give praise to Muhammad, which is encouraged as an act of faith in the Qur'an, and an attempt to reach out to young people and those who wish to understand more about Islam, and to explain why such a popular commercial recording artist would leave the business at the height of his career.

  15. An Other Cup

    An Other Cup


    An Other Cup is a studio album by Yusuf (formerly known as Cat Stevens), released on 10 November 2006 in Germany, 13 November in the UK and the US and worldwide on 14 November. It is Yusuf's first Western pop album since Back to Earth, which was released in 1978 under the name Cat Stevens.

  16. Roadsinger



    Roadsinger (To Warm You Through the Night) is a studio album by Yusuf Islam (formerly known as Cat Stevens). Roadsinger is Yusuf's second mainstream release since his return to music. The album made its debut on the Billboard 200 at position #41 and on the UK charts at #10.

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