Burials at Montmartre Cemetery, Paris

Posted May 4, 2011
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  1. Michel Berger
    #1

    Michel Berger

    1,197 views

    Michel Berger (28 November 1947 – 2 August 1992), born Michel Jean Hamburger, was a very successful French singer and songwriter. He was a central figure of France's pop music scene for two decades both as a singer and as a songwriter for well-known French artists like his wife France Gall, Françoise Hardy and Johnny Hallyday.


  2. Hector Berlioz
    #2

    Hector Berlioz

    845 views

    Hector Berlioz (11 December 1803 – 8 March 1869) was a French Romantic composer, best known for his compositions Symphonie fantastique and Grande messe des morts (Requiem). Berlioz made significant contributions to the modern orchestra with his Treatise on Instrumentation. He specified huge orchestral forces for some of his works, and conducted several concerts with more than 1,000 musicians. He also composed around 50 songs. His influence was critical for the further development of Romanticism, especially in composers like Richard Wagner, Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, Franz Liszt, Richard Strauss, and Gustav Mahler.


  3. Marie Taglioni
    #3

    Marie Taglioni

    211 views

    Marie Taglioni (23 April 1804 – 22 April 1884) was a ballet dancer of the Romantic ballet era, a central figure in the history of European dance. She was one of the most celebrated ballerinas of the romantic ballet, which was cultivated primarily at Her Majesty's Theatre in London, and at the Théâtre de l'Académie Royale de Musique of the Paris Opera Ballet. She is credited with (though not confirmed) being the first ballerina to truly dance en pointe.


  4. Alfred De Vigny
    #4

    Alfred De Vigny

    143 views

    Alfred Victor, Comte de Vigny (March 27, 1797 in Loches - September 17, 1863 in Paris) was a French poet, playwright, and novelist. He was a major figure in the French Romantic movement.


  5. Alexandre Dumas fils
    #5

    Alexandre Dumas fils

    340 views

    Alexandre Dumas, fils (27 July 1824 – 27 November 1895) was a French writer and dramatist, best known for Camille (a.k.a. The Lady of the Camellias). He was the son of Alexandre Dumas, père, also a writer and playwright. He was admitted to the Académie française in 1874 and awarded the Légion d'honneur in 1894.


  6. Jacques Offenbach
    #6

    Jacques Offenbach

    177 views

    Jacques Offenbach (20 June 1819 – 5 October 1880) was a German-born French composer, cellist and impresario of the romantic period. He is remembered for his nearly 100 operettas of the 1850s–1870s and his uncompleted opera The Tales of Hoffmann. He was a powerful influence on later composers of the operetta genre, particularly Johann Strauss, Jr. and Arthur Sullivan. His best-known works were continually revived during the 20th century, and many of his operettas continue to be staged in the 21st. The Tales of Hoffman remains part of the standard opera repertory.


  7. Émile Zola
    #7

    Émile Zola

    82 views

    Émile Édouard Charles Antoine Zola (/ˈzlə/; 2 April 1840 – 29 September 1902) was a French novelist, playwright, journalist, the best-known practitioner of the literary school of naturalism, and an important contributor to the development of theatrical naturalism. He was a major figure in the political liberalization of France and in the exoneration of the falsely accused and convicted army officer Alfred Dreyfus, which is encapsulated in the renowned newspaper headline J'accuse. Zola was nominated for the first and second Nobel Prize in Literature in 1901 and 1902.


  8. Heinrich Heine
    #8

    Heinrich Heine

    80 views

    Christian Johann Heinrich Heine (13 December 1797 – 17 February 1856) was a German poet, journalist, essayist, and literary critic. He is best known outside Germany for his early lyric poetry, which was set to music in the form of Lieder (art songs) by composers such as Robert Schumann and Franz Schubert. Heine's later verse and prose are distinguished by their satirical wit and irony. He is considered part of the Young Germany movement. His radical political views led to many of his works being banned by German authorities. Heine spent the last 25 years of his life as an expatriate in Paris.


  9. Nadia Boulanger
    #9

    Nadia Boulanger

    71 views

    Juliette Nadia Boulanger (16 September 1887 – 22 October 1979) was a French composer, conductor, and teacher. Among her students were many of the leading composers and musicians of the 20th century as well as celebrated living composers and musicians. She also performed as a pianist and organist.


  10. Margaret Kelly Leibovici
    #10

    Margaret Kelly Leibovici

    63 views


  11. Fernando Sor
    #11

    Fernando Sor

    57 views

    Josep Ferran Sorts i Muntades (baptized 14 February 1778 – died 10 July 1839) was a Spanish classical guitarist and composer. While he is best known for his guitar compositions, he also composed music for a wide range of genres, including opera, orchestra, string quartet, piano, voice, and ballet. His ballet score Cendrillon (Cinderella) received over one hundred performances. Sor's works for guitar range from pieces for beginning players to advanced players such as Variations on a Theme of Mozart. Sor's contemporaries considered him to be the best guitarist in the world, and his works for guitar have been widely played and reprinted since his death. Although modern classical guitar players usually do, Sor rarely used his ring finger or nails when playing.


  12. Vaslav Nijinsky
    #12

    Vaslav Nijinsky

    68 views

    Vaslav Nijinsky (also Vatslav; Russian: Ва́цлав Фоми́ч Нижи́нский; Polish: Wacław Niżyński; 12 March 1889/1890 – 8 April 1950) was a Russian ballet dancer and choreographer of Polish descent, cited as the greatest male dancer of the early 20th century. He was celebrated for his virtuosity and for the depth and intensity of his characterizations. He could dance en pointe, a rare skill among male dancers at the time and was admired for his seemingly gravity-defying leaps.


  13. Georges Feydeau
    #13

    Georges Feydeau

    42 views

    Georges Feydeau (8 December 1862 – 5 June 1921) was a French playwright of the era known as the Belle Époque. He is remembered for his many lively farces. He wrote over sixty plays and was a forerunner of absurdist theatre.


  14. Carole Fredericks
    #14

    Carole Fredericks

    62 views


  15. Fred Chichin
    #15

    Fred Chichin

    52 views

    Frédéric "Fred" Chichin (1 May 1954 – 28 November 2007) was a French musician and songwriter. He was born in Clichy, France.


  16. Claude Simon
    #16

    Claude Simon

    32 views

    Claude Simon (10 October 1913 – 6 July 2005) was a Malagasy-French author and academic, and the 1985 Nobel Laureate in Literature.


  17. Friedrich Kalkbrenner
    #17

    Friedrich Kalkbrenner

    28 views

    Friedrich Wilhelm Michael Kalkbrenner (November 2–8, 1785 – June 10, 1849) was a pianist, composer, piano teacher and piano manufacturer. German by birth, Kalkbrenner studied at the Paris Conservatoire starting at a young age and eventually settled in Paris, where he lived until his death in 1849. For these reasons, many historians refer to Kalkbrenner as being a French composer.


  18. André-Marie Ampère
    #18

    André-Marie Ampère

    29 views

    André-Marie Ampère (/ˈæmpɪər/; 20 January 1775 – 10 June 1836) was a French physicist and mathematician who was one of the founders of the science of classical electromagnetism, which he referred to as "electrodynamics". The SI unit of measurement of electric current, the ampere, is named after him.


  19. Edgar Degas
    #19

    Edgar Degas

    25 views

    Edgar Degas (/dˈɡɑː/ or /ˈdɡɑː/; born Hilaire-Germain-Edgar De Gas, 19 July 1834 – 27 September 1917) was a French artist famous for his paintings, sculptures, prints, and drawings. He is especially identified with the subject of dance; more than half of his works depict dancers. He is regarded as one of the founders of Impressionism, although he rejected the term, preferring to be called a realist. He was a superb draftsman, and particularly masterly in depicting movement, as can be seen in his renditions of dancers, racecourse subjects and female nudes. His portraits are notable for their psychological complexity and for their portrayal of human isolation.


  20. Adolphe Nourrit
    #20

    Adolphe Nourrit

    21 views

    Adolphe Nourrit (3 March 1802 – 8 March 1839) was a French operatic tenor, librettist, and composer. One of the most esteemed opera singers of the 1820s and 1830s, he was particularly associated with the works of Gioachino Rossini and Giacomo Meyerbeer.


  21. La Goulue
    #21

    La Goulue

    34 views

    Louise Weber (13 July 1866, Alsace-Lorraine – 30 January 1929) was a French can-can dancer who performed under the stage name of La Goulue ("the glutton"). She also was referred to as the Queen of Montmartre.


  22. Marie-Antoine Carême
    #22

    Marie-Antoine Carême

    23 views

    Marie Antoine (Antonin) Carême (8 June 1784 – 12 January 1833) was an early practitioner and exponent of the elaborate style of cooking known as grande cuisine, the "high art" of French cooking: a grandiose style of cookery favoured by both international royalty and by the newly rich of Paris. Carême is often considered as one of the first internationally renowned celebrity chefs.


  23. Amédée Gordini
    #23

    Amédée Gordini

    18 views

    Amedeo "Amédée" Gordini (June 23, 1899 – May 25, 1979) was an Italian-born race car driver and sports car manufacturer in France.


  24. Léon Foucault
    #24

    Léon Foucault

    19 views

    Jean Bernard Léon Foucault (18 September 1819 – 11 February 1868) was a French physicist best known for his demonstration of the Foucault pendulum, a device demonstrating the effect of the Earth's rotation. He also made an early measurement of the speed of light, discovered eddy currents, and is credited with naming the gyroscope (although he did not invent it).


  25. Auguste de Montferrand
    #25

    Auguste de Montferrand

    19 views

    Auguste de Montferrand (January 23, 1786 – July 10, 1858) was a French Neoclassical architect who worked primarily in Russia. His two best known works are the Saint Isaac's Cathedral and the Alexander Column in St. Petersburg.


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