British children's and young adults' literature (1900–1949)

Posted 5 years ago
The list "British children's and young adults' literature (1900–1949)" has been viewed 1 time.
This list has 28 members.

« Previous | 1 | 2 | Next »
  1. Roald Dahl

    Roald Dahl


    Roald Dahl (ˈr.ɑːl ˈdɑːl; 13 September 1916 – 23 November 1990) was a British novelist, short story writer, poet, screenwriter, and fighter pilot.

  2. Enid Blyton

    Enid Blyton


    Enid Mary Blyton (11 August 1897 – 28 November 1968) was an English children's writer whose books have been among the world's best-sellers since the 1930s, selling more than 600 million copies. Blyton's books are still enormously popular, and have been translated into almost 90 languages; her first book, Child Whispers, a 24-page collection of poems, was published in 1922. She wrote on a wide range of topics including education, natural history, fantasy, mystery stories and biblical narratives, and is best remembered today for her Noddy, Famous Five, and Secret Seven series.

  3. J.R.R. Tolkien

    J.R.R. Tolkien


    John Ronald Reuel Tolkien, CBE FRSL (/ˈtɒlkn/; 3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer, poet, philologist, and university professor who is best known as the author of the classic high-fantasy works The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion.

  4. A.A. Milne

    A.A. Milne


    Alan Alexander Milne (/ˈmɪln/; 18 January 1882 – 31 January 1956) was an English author, best known for his books about the teddy bear Winnie-the-Pooh and for various children's poems. Milne was a noted writer, primarily as a playwright, before the huge success of Pooh overshadowed all his previous work. Milne served in both World Wars, joining the British Army in World War I, and was a captain of the British Home Guard in World War II.

  5. Rudyard Kipling

    Rudyard Kipling


    Joseph Rudyard Kipling (ˈrʌdjərd ˈkɪplɪŋ RUD-yəd KIP-ling; 30 December 1865 – 18 January 1936) was an English short-story writer, poet, and novelist. He wrote tales and poems of British soldiers in India and stories for children. He was born in Bombay, in the Bombay Presidency of British India, and was taken by his family to England when he was five years old.

  6. J.M. Barrie

    J.M. Barrie


    Sir James Matthew Barrie, 1st Baronet, OM (9 May 1860 – 19 June 1937) was a Scottish author and dramatist, the child of a family of small-town weavers, and best remembered today as the creator of Peter Pan. He was educated in Scotland but moved to London, where he developed a career as a novelist and playwright. There he met the Llewelyn Davies boys who inspired him in writing about a baby boy who has magical adventures in Kensington Gardens (included in The Little White Bird), then to write Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up, a "fairy play" about an ageless boy and an ordinary girl named Wendy who have adventures in the fantasy setting of Neverland.

  7. Mary Norton

    Mary Norton


    Mary Norton, or Kathleen Mary Norton née Pearson (10 December 1903 – 29 August 1992), was an English author of children's books. She is best known for the The Borrowers series of low fantasy novels (1952 to 1982), which is named after its first book and, in turn, the tiny people who live secretly in the midst of contemporary human civilisation.

  8. Joyce Lankester Brisley

    Joyce Lankester Brisley


    Joyce Lankester Brisley was an English writer. She is most noted for her Milly-Molly-Mandy series, which were first printed in 1925 by the Christian Science Monitor. She both wrote and illustrated her books. Brisley had two sisters who were also illustrators: Nina.K.Brisley, and Ethel C Brisley. All three sisters illustrated postcards for Alfred Vivian Mansell, with Nina and Ethel becoming quite prolific. Brisley died in 1978 at the age of 82.

  9. T.H. White

    T.H. White


    Terence Hanbury "Tim" White (29 May 1906 – 17 January 1964) was an English author best known for his sequence of Arthurian novels, The Once and Future King, first published together in 1958. One of his most memorable stories is the first of that series, The Sword in the Stone, published as a stand-alone book in 1938.

  10. Rev. W. Awdry

    Rev. W. Awdry


    Wilbert Vere Awdry OBE (15 June 1911 – 21 March 1997) was an English Anglican cleric, railway enthusiast and children's author. Better known as the Reverend W. Awdry, he was the creator of Thomas the Tank Engine, the central figure in his acclaimed Railway Series.

  11. Kenneth Grahame

    Kenneth Grahame


  12. Elsie J. Oxenham

    Elsie J. Oxenham


    Elsie Jeanette Dunkerley (25 November 1880 - 9 January 1960), was an English girls' story writer, who took the name Oxenham as her pseudonym when her first book, Goblin Island, was published in 1907. Her Abbey Series of 38 titles are her best-known and best-loved books. In her lifetime she had 87 titles published and another two have since been published by her niece, who discovered the manuscripts in the early 1990s. She is considered a major figure among girls' story writers of the first half of the twentieth century, being one of the 'Big Three' with Elinor Brent-Dyer and Dorita Fairlie Bruce. Angela Brazil is as well-known - perhaps more so - but did not write her books in series about the same group of characters or set in the same place or school, as did the Big Three.

  13. Elinor Brent-Dyer

    Elinor Brent-Dyer


    Elinor M. Brent-Dyer (6 April 1894 – 20 September 1969) was a children's author who wrote more than 100 books during her lifetime, the most famous being the Chalet School series.

  14. Arthur Ransome

    Arthur Ransome


    Arthur Michell Ransome (18 January 1884 – 3 June 1967) was an English author and journalist. He is best known for writing the Swallows and Amazons series of children's books about the school-holiday adventures of children, mostly in the Lake District and the Norfolk Broads. Many of the books involve sailing; fishing and camping are other common subjects. The books remain popular and "Swallows and Amazons" is the basis for a tourist industry around Windermere and Coniston Water, the two lakes Ransome adapted as his fictional North Country lake.

  15. Angela Brazil

    Angela Brazil


    Angela Brazil (pronounced "brazzle") (30 November 1868 – 13 March 1947) was one of the first British writers of "modern schoolgirls' stories", written from the characters' point of view and intended primarily as entertainment rather than moral instruction. In the first half of the 20th century she published nearly 50 books of girls' fiction, the vast majority being boarding school stories. She also published numerous short stories in magazines.

  16. Eleanor Farjeon

    Eleanor Farjeon


    Eleanor Farjeon ((1881-02-13)13 February 1881 – 5 June 1965(1965-06-05)) was an English author of children's stories and plays, poetry, biography, history and satire. Several of her works had illustrations by Edward Ardizzone. Some of her correspondence has also been published. She won many literary awards and the Eleanor Farjeon Award for children's literature is presented annually in her memory by the Children's Book Circle, a society of publishers. She was the sister of the thriller writer Joseph Jefferson Farjeon.

  17. Dodie Smith

    Dodie Smith


    Dorothy Gladys "Dodie" Smith (3 May 1896 – 24 November 1990) was an English novelist and playwright. Smith is best known for her novel The Hundred and One Dalmatians. Her other works include I Capture the Castle and The Starlight Barking.

  18. E. Nesbit

    E. Nesbit


    Edith Nesbit (married name Edith Bland; 15 August 1858 – 4 May 1924) was an English author and poet; she published her books for children under the name of E. Nesbit.

  19. King of Kilba

    King of Kilba


    King of Kilba is a 1926 children's adventure story.

  20. Richmal Crompton

    Richmal Crompton


    Richmal Crompton Lamburn (15 November 1890 – 11 January 1969) was initially trained as a schoolmistress but later became a popular English writer, best known for her Just William series of books, humorous short stories, and to a lesser extent adult fiction books.

  21. Percy F. Westerman

    Percy F. Westerman


    Percy Francis Westerman (1876 – 22 February 1959) was a prolific author of children's literature, many of his books adventures with military and naval themes.

  22. Alison Uttley

    Alison Uttley


    Alison Uttley (17 December 1884 – 7 May 1976), née Alice Jane Taylor, was a British writer of over 100 books. She is now best known for her children's series about Little Grey Rabbit, and Sam Pig.

  23. Ruth Manning-Sanders

    Ruth Manning-Sanders


    Ruth Manning-Sanders (21 August 1886 – 12 October 1988) was a prolific British poet and author who was perhaps best known for her series of children's books in which she collected and retold fairy tales from all over the world. All told, she published more than 90 books during her lifetime.

  24. W.E. Johns

    W.E. Johns


    William Earl Johns (5 February 1893 – 21 June 1968) was an English pilot and writer of adventure stories, usually written under the pen name Captain W. E. Johns although he never held that rank. He is best remembered as the creator of the ace pilot and adventurer Biggles.

  25. Mrs George de Horne Vaizey

    Mrs George de Horne Vaizey


    Jessie Bell (1857 – 23 January 1917), later Jessie Mansergh, was an English writer born in Liverpool, who wrote under her married name Mrs George de Horne Vaizey.

« Previous | 1 | 2 | Next »

Desktop | Mobile
This website is part of the FamousFix entertainment community. By continuing past this page, and by your continued use of this site, you agree to be bound by and abide by the Terms of Use. Loaded in 0.13 secs.
Terms of Use  |  Copyright  |  Privacy
Copyright 2006-2015, FamousFix