American League Most Valuable Player Award winners

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  1. Alex Rodríguez

    Alex Rodríguez


    Alexander Emmanuel "Alex" Rodriguez (born July 27, 1975), nicknamed "A-Rod", is an American professional baseball infielder for the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played for the Seattle Mariners and the Texas Rangers. Rodriguez was one of the sport's most highly touted prospects and is considered one of the greatest baseball players of all time. During his 20-year career, Rodriguez has amassed a .298 batting average, 680 home runs, 2,038 runs batted in (RBI), and over 3,000 hits. He is a 14-time All-Star and has won three American League (AL) Most Valuable Player (MVP) Awards, ten Silver Slugger Awards, and two Gold Glove Awards. Rodríguez is the career record holder for grand slams with 25. However, he has led a highly controversial career due to his lucrative contracts and his use of illegal performance-enhancing drugs.

  2. Joe DiMaggio

    Joe DiMaggio


    Joseph Paul "Joe" DiMaggio (/dɨˈmɑːʒi/ /dɨˈmæi/; November 25, 1914 – March 8, 1999), born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio, nicknamed "Joltin' Joe" and "The Yankee Clipper", was an American Major League Baseball center fielder who played his entire 13-year career for the New York Yankees. He is perhaps best known for his 56-game hitting streak (May 15 – July 16, 1941), a record that still stands.

  3. Justin Verlander

    Justin Verlander


    Justin Brooks Verlander (born February 20, 1983) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Detroit Tigers of Major League Baseball (MLB).

  4. George Brett

    George Brett


    George Howard Brett (born May 15, 1953), is an American retired baseball third baseman and designated hitter who played 21 years in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Kansas City Royals.

  5. Jose Canseco

    Jose Canseco


    José Canseco Capas, Jr. (born July 2, 1964), is a Cuban-American former Major League Baseball (MLB) outfielder, and designated hitter. Canseco has admitted using performance-enhancing drugs during his playing career, and in 2005 wrote a tell-all book, Juiced: Wild Times, Rampant 'Roids, Smash Hits & How Baseball Got Big, in which he claimed that the vast majority of MLB players use steroids. After retiring from Major League Baseball, he also competed in boxing and mixed martial arts.

  6. Mickey Mantle

    Mickey Mantle


    Mickey Charles Mantle (October 20, 1931 – August 13, 1995), nicknamed "The Commerce Comet" or "The Mick", was an American professional baseball player. Mantle played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees as a center fielder and first baseman, from 1951 through 1968. Mantle was one of the best players and sluggers, and is regarded by many as the greatest switch hitter in baseball history. Mantle was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974 and was elected to the Major League Baseball All-Century Team in 1999.

  7. Roger Clemens

    Roger Clemens


    William Roger Clemens (born August 4, 1962), nicknamed "Rocket", is a retired American baseball pitcher who played 24 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for four teams. Clemens was one of the most dominant pitchers in major league history, tallying 354 wins, a 3.12 earned run average (ERA), and 4,672 strikeouts, the third-most all time. An 11-time All-Star and two-time World Series champion, he won seven Cy Young Awards during his career, the most of any pitcher in history. Clemens was known for his fierce competitive nature and hard-throwing pitching style, which he used to intimidate batters.

  8. Yogi Berra

    Yogi Berra


    Lawrence Peter "Yogi" Berra (born May 12, 1925) is a retired American Major League Baseball (MLB) catcher, manager, and coach. He played almost his entire 19-year baseball career (1946–65) for the New York Yankees. He is widely regarded as one of the best catchers in baseball history. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1972.

  9. Lou Gehrig

    Lou Gehrig


    Henry Louis "Lou" or "Buster" Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941) was an American baseball player. He was a Major League Baseball (MLB) first baseman who played 17 seasons for the New York Yankees, from 1923 through 1939. In 1939, he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame and was the first MLB player to have his uniform number retired.

  10. Reggie Jackson

    Reggie Jackson


    Reginald Martinez "Reggie" Jackson (born May 18, 1946) is an American former professional baseball right fielder who played 21 seasons for the Kansas City / Oakland Athletics, Baltimore Orioles, New York Yankees, and California Angels of Major League Baseball (MLB). Jackson was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1993.

  11. Ken Griffey Jr.

    Ken Griffey Jr.


    George Kenneth "Ken" Griffey, Jr. (born November 21, 1969), nicknamed "Junior" and "The Kid", is an American former professional baseball outfielder who played 22 years in Major League Baseball (MLB) for three teams (1989–2010). He spent most of his career with the Seattle Mariners and Cincinnati Reds, along with a short stint with the Chicago White Sox. A 13-time All-Star, Griffey was one of the most prolific home run hitters in baseball history; his 630 home runs rank as the sixth-most in MLB history. Griffey was also an exceptional defender and won 10 Gold Glove Awards in center field. He is tied for the record of most consecutive games with a home run (8 games, tied with Don Mattingly and Dale Long).

  12. Jason Giambi

    Jason Giambi


    Jason Gilbert Giambi (/iˈɑːmbi/; born January 8, 1971) is an American retired professional baseball first baseman and designated hitter. In his Major League Baseball (MLB) career, which began in 1995, he played for the Oakland Athletics, New York Yankees, Colorado Rockies and Cleveland Indians.

  13. Dennis Eckersley

    Dennis Eckersley


    Dennis Lee Eckersley (born October 3, 1954), nicknamed "Eck", is an American former Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher. Between 1975 and 1998, he pitched for the Cleveland Indians, Boston Red Sox, Chicago Cubs, Oakland Athletics and St. Louis Cardinals. Eckersley had success as a starter, but gained his greatest fame as a closer, becoming the first of two pitchers in MLB history to have both a 20-win season and a 50-save season in a career.

  14. Ted Williams

    Ted Williams


    Theodore Samuel "Ted" Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002) was an American Major League Baseball (MLB) left fielder, and later manager. Williams played his entire 19-year major league career for the Boston Red Sox from 1939–1942 and 1946–1960. Nicknamed "The Kid", "The Splendid Splinter", "Teddy Ballgame", "The Thumper" and "The Greatest Hitter Who Ever Lived", Williams is regarded as one of the greatest hitters in baseball history.

  15. Ivan Rodriguez

    Ivan Rodriguez


    Iván Rodríguez Torres (born November 27, 1971), nicknamed "Pudge" or "I-Rod" is a retired Major League Baseball catcher. In his career, he played for the Texas Rangers (on two different tours, comprising the majority of his career), Florida Marlins, Detroit Tigers, New York Yankees, Houston Astros and Washington Nationals.

  16. Don Mattingly

    Don Mattingly


    Donald Arthur Mattingly (born April 20, 1961) is an American professional baseball first baseman, coach and manager. Mattingly is currently the manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball. Nicknamed "The Hit Man" and "Donnie Baseball", he spent his entire 14-year career playing with the New York Yankees.

  17. Vladimir Guerrero

    Vladimir Guerrero


    Vladimir Alvino Guerrero (born February 9, 1975) is a Dominican former professional baseball player who spent 16 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB). A right fielder and designated hitter, he played for the Montreal Expos (1996–2003), Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (2004–2009), Texas Rangers (2010), and Baltimore Orioles (2011).

  18. Carl Yastrzemski

    Carl Yastrzemski


    Carl Michael Yastrzemski (/jəˈstrɛmski/; nicknamed "Yaz"; born August 22, 1939) is an American former Major League Baseball player. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1989. Yastrzemski played his entire 23-year baseball career with the Boston Red Sox (1961–1983). He was primarily a left fielder, but also played 33 games as a third baseman and mostly was a first baseman and designated hitter later in his career. Yastrzemski is an 18-time All-Star, the possessor of seven Gold Gloves, a member of the 3000 hit club, and the first American League player in that club to also accumulate over 400 home runs. He is second on the all-time list for games played, and third for total at-bats. He is the Red Sox' all-time leader in career RBIs, runs, hits, singles, doubles, total bases, and games played, and is second on the team's list for home runs behind Ted Williams . In 1967, Yastrzemski achieved a peak in his career, leading the Red Sox to the American League pennant for the first time in over two decades, in that season being voted the American League MVP, and was the last winner of the Triple Crown for batters in the Major Leagues until Miguel Cabrera achieved the feat in 2012.

  19. Frank Thomas

    Frank Thomas


    Frank Edward Thomas, Jr. (born May 27, 1968), nicknamed "The Big Hurt," is an American former first baseman in Major League Baseball who played for three American League (AL) teams from 1990 to 2008, all but the last three years with the Chicago White Sox. One of the most fearsome and devastating hitters of his era, he is the only player in major league history to have seven consecutive seasons (1991–1997) with a .300 batting average and at least 100 runs batted in (RBI), 100 runs scored, 100 walks and 20 home runs; over that period, he batted .330 and averaged 36 home runs and 118 RBI per year. A perennial MVP candidate through the 1990s, he was named the AL's Most Valuable Player by unanimous vote in 1993 after becoming the first White Sox player to hit 40 home runs, leading the team to a division title; he repeated as MVP in the strike-shortened 1994 season after batting .353 and leading the league in slugging average and runs. After two subpar seasons, he lost the MVP in a close vote in 2000 after posting career highs of 43 home runs and 143 RBI, also earning AL Comeback Player of the Year honors, as Chicago finished with the AL's best record.

  20. Hank Greenberg

    Hank Greenberg


    Henry Benjamin "Hank" Greenberg (January 1, 1911 – September 4, 1986), nicknamed "Hammerin' Hank," "Hankus Pankus" or "The Hebrew Hammer," was an American and former professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) primarily for the Detroit Tigers as a first baseman in the 1930s and 1940s. A member of the Baseball Hall of Fame, he was one of the premier power hitters of his generation and is widely considered as one of the greatest sluggers in baseball history.He served over four years in the United States Army and in World War II which took place during his major league career.

  21. Dick Allen

    Dick Allen


    Richard Anthony Allen (born March 8, 1942) is a former American Major League Baseball (MLB) player and Rhythm and Blues (R&B) singer. He played 15 seasons in the major leagues as a first baseman, third baseman, and outfielder most notably for the Philadelphia Phillies and Chicago White Sox, and is ranked among his sport's top offensive producers of the 1960s and early 1970s.

  22. Cal Ripken

    Cal Ripken


    Calvin Edwin "Cal" Ripken, Jr. (born August 24, 1960), nicknamed "The Iron Man", is an American former baseball shortstop and third baseman who played 21 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Baltimore Orioles (1981–2001). One of his position's most offensively productive players, Ripken compiled 3,184 hits, 431 home runs, and 1,695 runs batted in during his career, and he won two Gold Glove Awards for his defense. He was a 19-time All-Star and was twice named American League (AL) Most Valuable Player (MVP). Ripken is best known for holding the record for consecutive games played, 2,632, surpassing Lou Gehrig's streak of 2,130 that had stood for 56 years and that many deemed unbreakable. In 2007, he was elected into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility.

  23. Roger Maris

    Roger Maris


    Roger Eugene Maris (September 10, 1934 – December 14, 1985) was an American professional baseball player who played four seasons in the minor leagues and twelve seasons in the major leagues. Maris played right field on four Major League Baseball (MLB) teams, from 1957 through 1968.

  24. Juan Gonzalez

    Juan Gonzalez


    Juan Alberto González Vázquez (born October 20, 1969), is a former Major League Baseball right fielder. A full-time player at the age of 21 and a two-time MVP before his 30th birthday, González explained his propensity for bringing runners home simply by saying, "I concentrate more when I see men on base." One of the premier run producers and most feared hitters of the 1990s, González averaged 37 HR and 117 runs batted in per season from 1991 to 1999. He won the AL MVP award twice in that time span, 1996 and 1998. Gonzalez was known as a screaming line drive hitter, not a majestic fly-ball hitter as were many power hitters of the 1990s.

  25. Ichirô Suzuki

    Ichirô Suzuki


    Ichiro Suzuki (鈴木 一朗 Suzuki Ichirō), often referred to mononymously as Ichiro (イチロー Ichirō) (born October 22, 1973), is a Japanese professional baseball right fielder for the Miami Marlins of Major League Baseball (MLB). Originally a player in Japan's Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB), Ichiro moved to the United States in 2001 to play in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Seattle Mariners, with whom he spent 11 seasons, and later the New York Yankees. Ichiro has established a number of batting records, including MLB's single-season record for hits with 262. He had 10 consecutive 200-hit seasons, the longest streak by any player in history. Between his career hits in Japan's and America's major leagues, Ichiro stands at second place all-time in top-flight hits, trailing only Pete Rose.

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