American conservationists

Posted Oct 26, 2009
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  1. Harrison Ford
    #1

    Harrison Ford

    125,732 views

    Harrison Ford (born July 13, 1942) is an American actor and film producer. He gained worldwide fame for his starring roles as Han Solo in the original Star Wars epic space opera trilogy and the title character of the Indiana Jones film series. Ford is also known for his roles as Rick Deckard in the neo-noir dystopian science fiction film Blade Runner (1982), John Book in the thriller Witness (1985), and Jack Ryan in the action films Patriot Games (1992) and Clear and Present Danger (1994). Most recently, Ford reprised his role of Han Solo in Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015).


  2. Ted Turner
    #2

    Ted Turner

    27,214 views

    Robert Edward "Ted" Turner III (born November 19, 1938) is an American media mogul and philanthropist. As a businessman, he is known as founder of the Cable News Network more popularly known as CNN, the first 24-hour cable news channel. In addition, he founded WTBS, which pioneered the superstation concept in cable television.


  3. Theodore Roosevelt
    #3

    Theodore Roosevelt

    3,537 views

    Theodore Roosevelt (/ˈrzəvɛlt/ ROH-zə-velt; October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919), often referred to as Teddy or TR, was an American statesman, author, explorer, soldier, naturalist, and reformer who served as the 26th President of the United States, from 1901 to 1909. A leader of the Republican Party, he was a leading force of the Progressive Era. Born a sickly child with debilitating asthma, Roosevelt embraced a strenuous lifestyle and successfully regained his health. He integrated his exuberant personality, vast range of interests, and world-famous achievements into a "cowboy" persona defined by robust masculinity. Home-schooled, he became a lifelong naturalist before attending Harvard College. His first of many books, The Naval War of 1812 (1882), established his reputation as both a learned historian and a popular writer. He entered politics, becoming the leader of the reform faction of Republicans in New York's state legislature. Following the deaths of his wife and mother, he escaped to the wilderness and operated a cattle ranch in the Dakotas. He returned to run unsuccessfully for Mayor of New York City in 1886. He served as Assistant Secretary of the Navy under William McKinley, resigning after one year to serve with the Rough Riders, gaining national fame for courage during the War in Cuba. Returning a war hero, he was elected governor of New York in 1898. A frustrated party establishment made him McKinley's running mate in the election of 1900. He campaigned vigorously across the country, helping McKinley win reelection by a landslide on a platform of peace, prosperity, and conservatism.


  4. Jeff Corwin
    #4

    Jeff Corwin

    3,076 views

    Jeffrey Corwin (born July 11, 1967) is an American animal and nature conservationist, known as host and executive producer of the Animal Planet cable channel television programs The Jeff Corwin Experience and Corwin's Quest.


  5. Ansel Adams
    #5

    Ansel Adams

    1,355 views

    Ansel Easton Adams (February 20, 1902 – April 22, 1984) was an American photographer and environmentalist. His black-and-white landscape photographs of the American West, especially Yosemite National Park, have been widely reproduced on calendars, posters, and books.


  6. Edward Abbey
    #6

    Edward Abbey

    903 views

    Edward Paul Abbey (January 29, 1927 – March 14, 1989) was an American author and essayist noted for his advocacy of environmental issues, criticism of public land policies, and anarchist political views. His best-known works include the novel The Monkey Wrench Gang, which has been cited as an inspiration by radical environmental groups, and the non-fiction work Desert Solitaire.


  7. Mehgan Heaney-Grier
    #7

    Mehgan Heaney-Grier

    2,951 views

    Mehgan Heaney-Grier (born Mehgan Renee Heaney, August 26, 1977) is a US champion freediver, fashion model, actress, conservationist, and TV personality.


  8. Adolph Murie
    #8

    Adolph Murie

    272 views

    Adolph Murie (September 6, 1899 – August 16, 1974), the first scientist to study wolves in their natural habitat, was a naturalist, author, and Wildlife biologist who pioneered field research on wolves, bears, and other mammals and birds in Arctic and sub-Arctic Alaska. He was also instrumental in protecting wolves from eradication and in preserving the biological integrity of the Denali National Park and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.


  9. Aaron Faulls
    #9

    Aaron Faulls

    211 views

    Aaron Faulls (born February 6, 1975), is an American television personality, filmmaker, musician and marine conservationist. He is best known for his role as the original host of the television series Into The Drink, a Travel documentary-style series based around Faulls's background as an underwater filmmaker and journalist. He is also known for his appearances on Gangland, a documentary television series on the History Channel.


  10. Jack Hemingway
    #10

    Jack Hemingway

    181 views

    John Hadley Nicanor "Jack" Hemingway (October 10, 1923 – December 1, 2000) was a Canadian-American fly fisherman, conservationist, and writer. He was the son of Nobel Prize-laureate American novelist Ernest Hemingway.


  11. Rachel Carson
    #11

    Rachel Carson

    134 views

    Rachel Louise Carson (May 27, 1907 – April 14, 1964) was an American marine biologist and conservationist whose book Silent Spring and other writings are credited with advancing the global environmental movement.


  12. Wendell Berry
    #12

    Wendell Berry

    124 views

    Wendell E. Berry (born August 5, 1934) is an American novelist, poet, environmental activist, cultural critic, and farmer. A prolific author, he has written many novels, short stories, poems, and essays. He is an elected member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers, a recipient of The National Humanities Medal, and the Jefferson Lecturer for 2012. He is also a 2013 Fellow of The American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Berry was named the recipient of the 2013 Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award. On January 28, 2015, he became the first living writer to be ushered into the Kentucky Writers Hall of Fame.


  13. T A Barron
    #13

    T A Barron

    110 views

    Thomas Archibald Barron (born March 26, 1952) is an American writer of fantasy literature, books for children and young adults, and nature books.


  14. Arlo Hemphill
    #14

    Arlo Hemphill

    98 views

    Arlo Hanlin Hemphill (born October 7, 1971 in Baltimore, Maryland) is an American wilderness advocate. His educational background is in marine biology. Hemphill is a Fellow National of the Explorers Club and has been listed in Nature (Myers et al. 2000) as one of 100+ global biodiversity experts, credited for his expertise pertaining to the Greater Caribbean and the Tumbes-Chocó-Magdalena biodiversity hotspots. He is best known for his involvement in regional-scale ocean conservation and was a founding steering committee member of the Deep Sea Conservation Coalition, the Forum for the Conservation of the Patagonian Sea and Areas of Influence, and the Sargasso Sea Alliance.


  15. Laurance Rockefeller
    #15

    Laurance Rockefeller

    82 views

    Laurance Spelman Rockefeller (May 26, 1910 – July 11, 2004) was an American philanthropist, businessman, financier, and major conservationist. He was a prominent third-generation member of the Rockefeller family, being the fourth child of John Davison Rockefeller Jr. and Abigail Greene "Abby" Aldrich. His siblings were Abby, John III, Nelson, Winthrop, and David.


  16. John Muir
    #16

    John Muir

    63 views

    John Muir (1918–1977) was a structural engineer who worked for National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), who "dropped out," 1960s-style, to become a writer and long-haired car mechanic with a garage in Taos, New Mexico, specializing in maintenance and repair of Volkswagens. He was a distant descendant of the naturalist John Muir.


  17. Madison Grant
    #17

    Madison Grant

    34 views

    Madison Grant (November 19, 1865 – May 30, 1937) was an American lawyer known primarily for his work as a eugenicist and conservationist. As a eugenicist, Grant was responsible for one of the most famous works of scientific racism, and played an active role in crafting strong immigration restriction and anti-miscegenation laws in the United States.


  18. Jens Jensen (landscape architect)
    #18

    Jens Jensen (landscape architect)

    29 views

    Jens Jensen (September 13, 1860 - October 1, 1951) was a Danish-American landscape architect.


  19. Aldo Leopold
    #19

    Aldo Leopold

    32 views

    Aldo Leopold (January 11, 1887 – April 21, 1948) was an American author, scientist, ecologist, forester, conservationist, and environmentalist. He was a professor at the University of Wisconsin and is best known for his book A Sand County Almanac (1949), which has sold more than two million copies.


  20. Margaret Murie
    #20

    Margaret Murie

    27 views

    Margaret Thomas "Mardy" Murie (August 18, 1902 – October 19, 2003) was a naturalist, author, adventurer, and conservationist. Dubbed the "Grandmother of the Conservation Movement" by both the Sierra Club and the Wilderness Society, she helped in the passage of the Wilderness Act, and was instrumental in creating the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. She was the recipient of the Audubon Medal, the John Muir Award, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom—the highest civilian honor awarded by the United States.


  21. Doug Peacock
    #21

    Doug Peacock

    25 views

    Doug Peacock is an American naturalist, outdoorsman, and author. He is best known for his book Grizzly Years: In Search of the American Wilderness, a memoir of his experiences in the 1970s and 1980s, much of which was spent alone in the wilderness of the western United States observing grizzly bears.


  22. John D. Rockefeller, Jr.
    #22

    John D. Rockefeller, Jr.

    30 views

    John Davison Rockefeller, Jr. (January 29, 1874 – May 11, 1960) was an American financer and philanthropist who was a prominent member of the Rockefeller family. He was the only son among the five children of Standard Oil co-founder John D. Rockefeller and the father of the five famous Rockefeller brothers. In biographies, he is commonly referred to as "Junior" to distinguish him from his father, "Senior".


  23. Jeanne Rose
    #23

    Jeanne Rose

    25 views


    Jeanne Rose (born 9 January 1937) is an herbalist/aromatherapist who changed the current practice of American herbalism when she began her public work in 1969 with the publication of her first book, Herbs & Things, Jeanne Rose's Herbal. She began her herbal career in California as an undergraduate with studies in botany and science and a degree from San Jose State College. She went on to graduate work in Marine Biology and Ecology. In 1969, she wrote the first modern book of Herbalism, Herbs & Things. She taught herbs and aromatherapy at the University of California Extension throughout the 1970s and privately throughout the United States. She has lived in San Francisco since 1967 and established a herbal/aromatic garden and study center. Becoming concerned about the environment and the production of aromatic plants, she organized the aromatherapy industry and a group, The Aromatic Plant Project, to support local and organic production of aromatic plants; to provide resources for growers and distillers; to ensure high quality aromatherapy products and to educate consumers as to the appropriate and beneficial uses of these aromatic products.


  24. Bob Marshall (wilderness activist)
    #24

    Bob Marshall (wilderness activist)

    24 views

    Robert "Bob" Marshall (January 2, 1901 – November 11, 1939) was an American forester, writer and wilderness activist. The son of Louis Marshall, a wealthy constitutional lawyer and conservationist, and his wife, Bob Marshall developed a love for the outdoors as a young child. A consummate hiker and climber, he visited the Adirondack Mountains frequently during his youth, ultimately becoming one of the first Adirondack Forty-Sixers. He also traveled to the Alaskan wilderness and wrote numerous articles and books, including the bestselling 1933 book Arctic Village.


  25. A. E. London
    #25

    A. E. London

    20 views

    Anne E. London (born December 31, 1957 in southern California) is an American artist and conservationist. Her art was greatly affected by a trip to a refuge for retired media animals, after which she started to focus on doing dramatic pieces that provide emotive portraits of wild animals, especially endangered species. She lives in Mandeville,Louisiana and works primarily with charcoal, watercolor, and engravings. London has established her reputation through producing art for non-profit wildlife preservation organizations and through showing and selling her work at art fairs across the United States.


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