African-American baseball players

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  1. Negro league baseball players

    Negro league baseball players

     - 67 lists, 562 members

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  1. Derek Jeter

    Derek Jeter


    Derek Sanderson Jeter (/ˈtər/ JEE-tər) (born June 26, 1974) is an American former professional baseball shortstop who played 20 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees. A five-time World Series champion, Jeter is regarded as a central figure of the Yankees' success of the late 1990s and early 2000s for his hitting, baserunning, fielding, and leadership. He is the Yankees' all-time career leader in hits (3,465), doubles (544), games played (2,747), stolen bases (358), times on base (4,716), plate appearances (12,602) and at bats (11,195). His accolades include 14 All-Star selections, five Gold Glove Awards, five Silver Slugger Awards, two Hank Aaron Awards, and a Roberto Clemente Award. Jeter became the 28th player to reach 3,000 hits and finished his career sixth all-time in career hits and the all-time MLB leader in hits by a shortstop.

  2. Matt Kemp

    Matt Kemp


    Matthew Ryan "Matt" Kemp (born September 23, 1984) is an American professional baseball outfielder for the San Diego Padres of Major League Baseball (MLB). He has been named to two All-Star teams and has won two Gold Glove Awards (2009 and 2011) and two Silver Slugger Awards (2009 and 2011). He began his professional career in the Los Angeles Dodgers organization in 2003, and played with the Dodgers from 2006 until 2014.

  3. David Justice

    David Justice


    David Christopher Justice (born April 14, 1966) is a former American outfielder and designated hitter in Major League Baseball who played for the Atlanta Braves (1989–1996), Cleveland Indians (1997–2000), New York Yankees (2000–2001), and Oakland Athletics (2002).

  4. Curtis Granderson

    Curtis Granderson


    Curtis Granderson, Jr. (born March 16, 1981) is an American professional baseball outfielder for the New York Mets of Major League Baseball (MLB). He has also played in MLB for the Detroit Tigers (2004–2009) and the New York Yankees (2010–2013).

  5. Deion Sanders

    Deion Sanders


    Deion Luwynn Sanders, Sr. (/ˈdɒn/; born August 9, 1967) is an American former football and baseball player, who works as an analyst for CBS Sports and the NFL Network. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame on August 6, 2011.

  6. Bo Jackson

    Bo Jackson


    Vincent Edward "Bo" Jackson (born November 30, 1962) is an American former baseball and football player. He is the only athlete to be named an All-Star in two major American sports. He was named the greatest athlete of all time by ESPN.

  7. Barry Bonds

    Barry Bonds


    Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964) is an American former professional baseball left fielder who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) with the Pittsburgh Pirates and San Francisco Giants. Bonds received seven NL MVP awards and 14 All-Star selections, and is considered to be one of the greatest baseball players of all time.

  8. Grady Sizemore

    Grady Sizemore


    Grady Sizemore III (born August 2, 1982) is an American professional baseball outfielder for the Tampa Bay Rays of Major League Baseball (MLB). He played in MLB for the Cleveland Indians from 2004 through 2011, but did not play in the majors for the following two years after back and knee injuries. He returned in 2014 with the Boston Red Sox and played for the Philadelphia Phillies from 2014 to 2015. He is a three-time MLB All-Star and a two-time Gold Glove Award winner. He also won a Silver Slugger Award.

  9. Jackie Robinson

    Jackie Robinson


    Jack Roosevelt "Jackie" Robinson (January 31, 1919 – October 24, 1972) was an American Major League Baseball (MLB) second baseman who became the first African American to play in the major leagues in the modern era. Robinson broke the baseball color line when the Brooklyn Dodgers started him at first base on April 15, 1947. The Dodgers, by playing Robinson, ended racial segregation that had relegated black players to the Negro leagues since the 1880s. Robinson was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1962.

  10. Reggie Jackson

    Reggie Jackson


    Reginald Martinez "Reggie" Jackson (born May 18, 1946) is an American former professional baseball right fielder who played 21 seasons for the Kansas City / Oakland Athletics, Baltimore Orioles, New York Yankees, and California Angels of Major League Baseball (MLB). Jackson was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1993.

  11. Ryan Howard

    Ryan Howard


    {{Infobox MLB player | name = Ryan Howard | image = Ryan Howard (18689970748).jpg | image_size = 240px | caption = Howard with the Philadelphia Phillies | position = First baseman | team = Philadelphia Phillies | number = 6 | bats = Left | throws = Left | birth_date = (1979-11-19) November 19, 1979 (age 35) | birth_place = St. Louis, Missouri | debutdate = September 2 | debutyear = 2004 | debutteam = Philadelphia Phillies| | statyear = August 25, 2015 | stat1label = Batting average | stat1value = .263 | stat2label = Hits | stat2value = 1,402 | stat3label = Home runs | stat3value = 355 | stat4label = Runs batted in | stat4value = 1,130 | teams =

  12. Otis Nixon

    Otis Nixon


    Otis Junior Nixon, Jr. (born January 9, 1959) is a former Major League Baseball player. He was a center fielder and switch-hitter who played from 1983 to 1999. He has stolen the most bases for a player that has never appeared in an MLB All-Star game since the All-Star Game was inaugurated in 1933.

  13. Ken Griffey Jr.

    Ken Griffey Jr.


    George Kenneth "Ken" Griffey, Jr. (born November 21, 1969), nicknamed "Junior" and "The Kid", is an American former professional baseball outfielder who played 22 years in Major League Baseball (MLB) for three teams (1989–2010). He spent most of his career with the Seattle Mariners and Cincinnati Reds, along with a short stint with the Chicago White Sox. A 13-time All-Star, Griffey was one of the most prolific home run hitters in baseball history; his 630 home runs rank as the sixth-most in MLB history. Griffey was also an exceptional defender and won 10 Gold Glove Awards in center field. He is tied for the record of most consecutive games with a home run (8 games, tied with Don Mattingly and Dale Long).

  14. Willie Mays

    Willie Mays


    Willie Howard Mays, Jr. (born May 6, 1931), nicknamed "The Say Hey Kid" is a retired American Major League Baseball (MLB) center fielder who spent almost all of his 22 season career playing for the New York and San Francisco Giants before finishing with the New York Mets. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1979, his first year of eligibility.

  15. Kenny Lofton

    Kenny Lofton


    Kenneth "Kenny" Lofton (born May 31, 1967) is a former Major League Baseball (MLB) outfielder. Lofton was a six-time All-Star (1994–1999), four-time Gold Glove Award winner (1993–1996), and at retirement, was ranked fifteenth among all-time stolen base leaders with 622. During his career, he played for the Houston Astros, Cleveland Indians (three different times), Atlanta Braves, Chicago White Sox, San Francisco Giants, Pittsburgh Pirates, Chicago Cubs, New York Yankees, Philadelphia Phillies, Los Angeles Dodgers, and Texas Rangers.

  16. Gary Sheffield

    Gary Sheffield


    Gary Antonian Sheffield (born November 18, 1968) is an American retired Major League Baseball outfielder. He played with eight teams in the major leagues from 1988 to 2009. He currently works as a sports agent.

  17. Carl Crawford

    Carl Crawford


    Carl Demonte Crawford (born August 5, 1981), nicknamed "The Perfect Storm", is an American professional baseball left fielder with the Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball (MLB). He bats and throws left-handed.

  18. Kirby Puckett

    Kirby Puckett


    Kirby Puckett (March 14, 1960 – March 6, 2006) was an American professional baseball player. He played his entire 12-year Major League Baseball (MLB) career as a center fielder for the Minnesota Twins (1984–1995). Puckett is the Twins' all-time leader in career hits, runs, doubles, and total bases. At the time of his retirement, his .318 career batting average was the highest by any right-handed American League batter since Joe DiMaggio.

  19. C.C. Sabathia

    C.C. Sabathia


    Carsten Charles "CC" Sabathia, Jr. (born July 21, 1980) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball (MLB). Upon signing with the Yankees prior to the 2009 season, Sabathia became the highest-paid pitcher in MLB history. Currently in his 15th year as a major league pitcher, Sabathia had never had more losses than wins in a season before 2014. He is listed at 6'7" and 290 pounds.

  20. Hank Aaron

    Hank Aaron


    Henry Louis "Hank" Aaron (born February 5, 1934), nicknamed "Hammer", or "Hammerin' Hank", is a retired American Major League Baseball (MLB) right fielder. He played 21 seasons for the Milwaukee/Atlanta Braves in the National League (NL) and 2 seasons for the Milwaukee Brewers in the American League (AL), from 1954 through 1976. Aaron held the MLB record for career home runs for 33 years, and he still holds several MLB offensive records. He hit 24 or more home runs every year from 1955 through 1973, and is the only player to hit 30 or more home runs in a season at least fifteen times. In 1999, The Sporting News ranked Aaron fifth on their "100 Greatest Baseball Players" list.

  21. Tony Gwynn

    Tony Gwynn


    Anthony Keith "Tony" Gwynn, Sr. (May 9, 1960 – June 16, 2014), nicknamed "Mr. Padre", was an American professional baseball right fielder who played 20 seasons (1982–2001) in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the San Diego Padres. The left-handed hitting Gwynn won eight batting titles in his career, tied for the most in National League (NL) history. He is considered one of the best and most consistent hitters in baseball history. He had a .338 career batting average, never hitting below .309 in any full season. Gwynn was a 15-time All-Star, recognized for his skills both on offense and defense with seven Silver Slugger Awards and five Gold Glove Awards. He was the rare player in his era that stayed with a single team his entire career, and he played in the only two World Series appearances in San Diego's franchise history. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2007, his first year of eligibility.

  22. Tim Raines

    Tim Raines


    Timothy Raines (born September 16, 1959), nicknamed "Rock", is an American professional baseball coach and former player. He played as a left fielder in Major League Baseball for six teams from 1979 to 2002 and was best known for his 13 seasons with the Montreal Expos. He is regarded as one of the best leadoff hitters and baserunners in baseball history. In 2013, Raines began working in the Toronto Blue Jays organization as a roving outfield and baserunning instructor.

  23. Frank Thomas

    Frank Thomas


    Frank Edward Thomas, Jr. (born May 27, 1968), nicknamed "The Big Hurt," is an American former first baseman in Major League Baseball who played for three American League (AL) teams from 1990 to 2008, all but the last three years with the Chicago White Sox. One of the most fearsome and devastating hitters of his era, he is the only player in major league history to have seven consecutive seasons (1991–1997) with a .300 batting average and at least 100 runs batted in (RBI), 100 runs scored, 100 walks and 20 home runs; over that period, he batted .330 and averaged 36 home runs and 118 RBI per year. A perennial MVP candidate through the 1990s, he was named the AL's Most Valuable Player by unanimous vote in 1993 after becoming the first White Sox player to hit 40 home runs, leading the team to a division title; he repeated as MVP in the strike-shortened 1994 season after batting .353 and leading the league in slugging average and runs. After two subpar seasons, he lost the MVP in a close vote in 2000 after posting career highs of 43 home runs and 143 RBI, also earning AL Comeback Player of the Year honors, as Chicago finished with the AL's best record.

  24. Lorenzo Cain

    Lorenzo Cain


    Lorenzo Lamar Cain (born April 13, 1986) is an American professional baseball center fielder for the Kansas City Royals of Major League Baseball (MLB). The Milwaukee Brewers drafted him in the 17th round of the 2004 MLB Draft from Tallahassee Community College in Florida. In 2010, Cain made his MLB debut, and, following the season, the Brewers traded him to Kansas City with three other players for pitcher Zack Greinke.

  25. Milton Bradley

    Milton Bradley


    Milton Obelle Bradley, Jr. (born April 15, 1978) is a retired Major League Baseball (MLB) outfielder. Standing 6 feet (1.8 m) and weighing 215 pounds (98 kg), Bradley is a switch hitter who throws right-handed. Over his 11-year MLB career, Bradley played with the Montreal Expos (2000–2001), Cleveland Indians (2001–2003), Los Angeles Dodgers (2004–2005), Oakland Athletics (2006–2007), San Diego Padres (2007), Texas Rangers (2008), Chicago Cubs (2009), and Seattle Mariners (2010–2011). His career was also mired by legal troubles and several notable on-field incidents.

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